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Topic: Share tips you have come across (Read 161438 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

#765
Jun 17, 2020, 08:56 pm Last Edit: Jun 17, 2020, 09:25 pm by larryd
Referring back to Post #250 and subsequent Post #758.

The below addition for the 'Pinch Vise' makes it much more user friendly.

Here we are adding a rubber spacer to keep the jaws open while not compressed.

3/18" O.D. 'Surgical Rubber Tubing' is cut to a height of 1/8" (spacer).

The 1/8" rubber spacer is placed over the 6-32 set screw, i.e. between the two washers, see images below.

When the finger nut (top nylon standoff) is loosened, the 1/8" rubber spacer opens our vise.

This pinch vise can still accommodate a PCB thickness down to a 4 thou object.


















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larryd

#766
Jun 20, 2020, 03:30 am Last Edit: Jun 20, 2020, 03:53 am by larryd
For more leverage when tightening the 'Pinch Vise', add a 10mm standoff to the offset screw.

Moving the 'screw washer' to the top position helps identify the 'pinch point' 180 degrees away.



Or just use a 10mm long screw ;)






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larryd

#767
Jun 28, 2020, 06:15 pm Last Edit: Jun 28, 2020, 06:49 pm by larryd
Sometimes all you need is ONE or TWO 'Simple Logic Gate(s)' to finish a design.

See attached PDF:





Example:





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wilykat

Where were you when I needed one lousy NOT gate to finish my project last year?  I got a 7400 IC (2 inputs tied to make it a NOT) and 3 wasted gates on that IC.

larryd

Quote
Where were you when I needed one lousy NOT gate to finish my project last year?
:smiley-cry:
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larryd

#770
Jul 01, 2020, 11:17 pm Last Edit: Jul 02, 2020, 08:19 am by larryd
Program 'Flow Charts' are not used much these days, however, every now and then we might need to make one.

See the attached PDF which discusses how you can use 'MS Word 365' to make your flow charting easier.







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larryd

#771
Jul 03, 2020, 12:26 am Last Edit: Jul 03, 2020, 12:43 am by larryd
Use an inexpensive RJ45 tool to make cutting Male and Female headers easy.

An inexpensive tool is best because they are easily modifiable.

We must modify the tool by turning the wire cutting blade from a flush cutting blade to a chisel cutting blade.

Remove both the cutting blade and one of the stripping blades.

Put these two blades back to back as in the images and reinstall into the cutting blade position.

The cutting blade is parallel to the tool's surface, so header cutting results in a nice, unfractured, cut.
























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