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Topic: Guidance to be an IoT developer (Read 670 times) previous topic - next topic

Lucifer22334

Hi all,

I have completed my electronics and communication degree in 2018(Nothing learned there just clearing exams and getting degree and writing assignments and all) and for college, I had made a simple smart school bell ring system on NodeMCU with SD card module and DFPlayer and controlled it through Mobile app and a website hosted on 000webhost. It was simply scheduling time and automatically switching time and all just on a toggle switch. I didn't have any programming subjects in school or college. Python and Arduino language are first I started using and Mostly I can work in python.

Then I started working as an IoT Developer in a company that had just started IoT in R&D. I am currently working here and in the 1 year's time, I learned about Raspberry PI and different packages and modules it uses to communicate with the sensors. Learned communication protocols like UART, SPI, and I2C. I worked with Mycroft's open-source voice assistant and AVS device SDK connected with Alexa Skill to create custom skill and AWS lambda to parse and send data again to the raspberry pi. Tried AWS IoT with Paho sometime ago an learned about MQTT. I know beginner's python and Flask(beginner level), openCV and python interface with MSSQL and MongoDB and CRUD operations. I have also worked with the ThingSpeak cloud. I am now the only person in this company knowing IoT. If I want to switch to another I don't know what should I know and all.

As there is no vision of this company for Industry-focused PoC in IoT I am not working just searching and learning about different achievements in IoT. I had tried once IOTA with Raspberry PI. I know how to use Diptrace and create a top and bottom layer circuit with custom components. I have a fair knowledge of Arduino programming. I just know the basic syntax. Mostly I search online for a program of a reference and create my own. I can read and understand it's programming.

I know only this much in terms of IoT. I want to grow in the field of IoT. I need guidance on: "what should I learn? Which certifications should I acquire? What things I should know? Which community to join to get me updated?" Please help me grow my career and guide me. I am afraid and I cannot make any rash decisions so I am reaching out to trusted this community.

Robin2

#1
Jan 27, 2020, 12:48 pm Last Edit: Jan 27, 2020, 12:49 pm by Robin2
As far as I can see none of what you describe has anything to do with Arduinos so why are you asking your question on this Arduino Forum?

Quote
Nothing learned there just clearing exams and getting degree and writing assignments and all
That is a very sad statement. Maybe you were not paying attention.

Now that you have a degree I suggest that the next thing is for you to identify a project you can create and be able to say "I did that" to show that you did actually get some value from your education and that you can move from theory to practice.

It would probably be best if that project is within your present company - employers (current and future) attach a lot of value to staff who help the company. However if there really is no opportunity within your company then a personal project would be a good idea. Maybe there are OpenSource IoT projects you could contribute to?


Quote
Which certifications should I acquire?
That seems a strange question from someone who claims to have learned nothing while acquiring a degree.


...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Lucifer22334

As far as I can see none of what you describe has anything to do with Arduinos so why are you asking your question on this Arduino Forum?
That is a very sad statement. Maybe you were not paying attention.

Now that you have a degree I suggest that the next thing is for you to identify a project you can create and be able to say "I did that" to show that you did actually get some value from your education and that you can move from theory to practice.

It would probably be best if that project is within your present company - employers (current and future) attach a lot of value to staff who help the company. However, if there really is no opportunity within your company then a personal project would be a good idea. Maybe there are OpenSource IoT projects you could contribute to?

That seems a strange question from someone who claims to have learned nothing while acquiring a degree.


...R
What I meant by learning nothing was that there was no real-life practical application knowledge and most of were almost 10-12 years old knowledge in books. And for the whole year, we have to just prepare for exams, internal and external and write assignments do a presentation on the subject chapter, etc. I learned what I could and what I will be able to use in the future from there. As the book's knowledge was pretty old and there were no practicals I said nothing learned. And if there is a chance of certification by learning through practicals I will definitely do it.

Can you provide me a good source for finding open-source IoT projects?

Robin2

#3
Jan 27, 2020, 01:46 pm Last Edit: Jan 27, 2020, 01:50 pm by Robin2
Can you provide me a good source for finding open-source IoT projects?
No, I have little or no interest in the concept.


A person with an IT degree will probably have come across Google and, hopefully, the concept of doing his own research.

Your value as an employee will be in direct proportion to your ability to find things yourself and explain them to others.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Lucifer22334

No, I have little or no interest in the concept.


A person with an IT degree will probably have come across Google and, hopefully, the concept of doing his own research.

Your value as an employee will be in direct proportion to your ability to find things yourself and explain them to others.

...R
Thanks. But as I have tried searching for the project mostly come up was open-source platforms and tools. I will search again and thanks for giving hint for growing.

GaryP

...and most of were almost 10-12 years old knowledge...
Well, what kind of things have been changed in that time? For me, that is still fresh material.

Cheers,
Kari
The only law for me; Ohms Law: U=R*I       P=U*I
Note to self: "Damn! Why don't you just fix it!!!"

Robin2

Well, what kind of things have been changed in that time? For me, that is still fresh material.
Shheeesh ... 30 year old stuff is new for me.

But perhaps we are older than the OP ?

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

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