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Topic: Did I kill it? (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

cereeal

I'm currently working on a RGB LED strip project and had a single strip hooked up (I'm using a TLC5940) and was about to move on to a second strip. I had the common anode on the strip plugged into the Vin pin which was powered by a 9V 1A power supply. With the addition of the new common anode I put the 9V power on the opposite side of my breadboard where I had the 5V power running. I did this while forgetting I had the two power lines jumped across. So basically I plugged the 9V supply into the 5V pin, as soon as I saw smoke I completely unplugged everything. I connected the Arduino to the USB to upload the blink program to make sure everything was alright but my computer will no longer recognize the board, but it still gets power (green light comes on).
So I say all this to ask, is it dead or do I have hope?

spycatcher2k

You let out the magic blue smoke! ! ! ! The chances are you fried your arduino - I have a FREE service to test Arduinos - I only charge for parts to repair them . You cover return postage Via PAYPAL. PM me and I'll give you my address, send it to me, I'll diagnose fault - and provide cost of repair (if viable).

All the Best


Drew
Mrs Drew
-=-
http://www.uk-pcb.co.uk - UK PCB Fab Company
I will design & code for you, but I will also charge you (PM me)
If you don't like my answers, realize : I'm not being cheeky, I'm Just trying to prompt you to use your own brain/google etc.

cmiyc

Which Arduino are you using?

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as soon as I saw smoke I completely unplugged everything.

Identifying where the smoke came from would be helpful in your troubleshooting.

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So basically I plugged the 9V supply into the 5V pin

None of the active ICs on the Arduino board are tolerant of 9V. 

Remove the ATmega328 as a first step.  If your computer will recognize the board then you know it is bad but the USB to Serial converter is still working.  If you have the components to do so, try building a Barebones or Breadboard Arduino with the ATmega328 to see if it works standalone.

Use a multimeter check to your 5V and 3.3V outputs when connected to the 9V supply.  Keep in mind that if the regulators are damaged under no to light load, they may be stable.  However they may no longer supply their full output capability anymore.
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

cereeal

Both the 5V and 3.3V are functioning fine. I unfortunately don't have the required materials to have the ATmega on a standalone breadboard, my computer would not however recognize the Arduino even without the chip in it.
I have an Arduino Uno. Is there any items that are replaceable on the board that may have blown? I just don't want to have to get a new one if there's other options.
Thanks.

Grumpy_Mike

The serial / USB chip is the one that is blown. It is the small square next to the USB socket. Do you think you can get that off? You need a hot air desoldering station. Have you got one? Can you use it?
I would guess no to both.

By the time you see the smoke it is already dead.

Moral - never wire things up with the power on.

cereeal

I have a DIY hot air desolderer, so if you could be more specific as to what part needs to be replaced and where I can find that replacement, I would greatly appreciate it.

cmiyc

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so if you could be more specific as to what part needs to be replaced


The ATmega 8u2 which is the "small square next to the USB socket."
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

CrossRoads

How hard is it to reprogram the 8U2 after the remove & replace?
Is an ICSP programmer needed, along with adding pins in the 6 holes next to the 8U2 chip?
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

cmiyc

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Is an ICSP programmer needed, along with adding pins in the 6 holes next to the 8U2 chip?

Good question. 

Can the DFU instructions be used on a virgin-8u2?
http://arduino.cc/en/Hacking/DFUProgramming8U2

Alternatively, the original poster could remove the 8u2 and use a FTDI breakout board...
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

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