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Topic: Resources for Remote Teaching (Read 426 times) previous topic - next topic

anthony-sharonov

Jan 31, 2021, 10:54 pm Last Edit: Jan 31, 2021, 11:03 pm by anthony-sharonov
Hello, my name is Anthony and I am a sophomore in high school. I am co-leader of a club and I have some resources for educators to help during remote teaching. Please feel free to add on with any resources you may have.

Arduino simulators


Tinkercad - If you go to the "circuit" section there is a very nice user-friendly simulator. It provides all sorts of basic components, programming can be done in either blocks or normal Arduino text. (ONLINE)

UnoArduSim - This is good to see RAM usage, has nice Serial monitor and debugging, but limited components. What's nice about this is that you can save your code as actual .ino files. More information on this forum. (SOFTWARE)

CircuitIO - This simulator has such detailed components, with descriptions for each component (good for teaching). Has a nice interface, but you can't customize where components go. The coding area is very nicely made and you can download .ino files as well (ONLINE).

Organization


Discord - Discord is the platform we use for communication, live teaching, and organization. This can be both an online source or software, where you can create "text" channels and "voice" channels. Permissions can be set so only certain people (like educators vs students) can enter special text/voice channels. You can also screen share and there a lot of other nice features you can check out like "pinging" where you send notifications to a specific person/group. May be a bit confusing at first for new users. (ONLINE + SOFTWARE)

Google classroom - The standard for most schools. Here you can set announcements, assignments, and attach files. This is a good option if most people are used to this/your institution already uses it. Hard to do real time chat + send notifications if people don't check their emails. (ONLINE)

Live teaching


Discord - Again, this is the application that my club uses. Has all of the basic features like screen sharing and webcams. This is good to use if you use discord for organizational purposes so you everything is in the same place. For example, when it's time to meet, I "ping" everyone (send a notification) to join the "arduino voice channel," once the club starts I can post lesson plans in the "arduino text channel." (ONLINE + SOFTWARE)

Zoom - The standard form of communication, has all the basic features like screensharing and webcam and has a nice "whiteboard" feature where you can draw and type text on. (SOFTWARE)

Google meets - Also has basic features like screensharing and webcams, uses Google's "jamboard" (see under Additional Resources). Good if you use google classroom for organizational purposes. (ONLINE)

Microsoft teams - Again with basic features. What I like about teams is if your insitution uses microsoft programs (excel, word, powerpoint, etc.), you can collaborate on documents in real time. Also has a nice chat feature. (SOFTWARE)

Additional resources/information


Jamboard - Very nice real time whiteboard. Good to use if you use Google meets/classroom and for discord. I like to screenshare this during live presentations, and you can "share" this with others so they can draw and collaborate in real time with you.

I highly suggest getting a tripod with your webcam so during live presentations you can do a "hand cam" where you show real life hardware while your students follow along on a simulator.

Thank you.
I truly hope this helps! Reach out to me if you have any questions! Thanks.

blnkjns

#1
Feb 12, 2021, 04:55 pm Last Edit: Feb 12, 2021, 05:01 pm by blnkjns
Google classroom - The standard for most schools. Here you can set announcements, assignments, and attach files. This is a good option if most people are used to this/your institution already uses it. Hard to do real time chat + send notifications if people don't check their emails. (ONLINE)
We have a saying in the land of the blind the cyclop is king. Sorry, but Google Classroom has nothing to do with facilitating education. It is free and a dumb 1-click setup for elementary schools. The schools of my kids use it, but it is more like a private Facebook group.
If you want a good online system, check this:
https://moodle.org/
Here you can do everything, including privately hosted video conferencing. We use it for class documents, grading, uploading tasks, checking for plagiarism, hosting files and lectures, scheduling, class enrollment.


https://pybricks.com
Great for turning Technic Lego into cheap Mindstorms

https://photopea.com
Excellent Photoshop clone online

https://processing.com
My go to for teaching kids to code from home, and if they can't install, you can always go to:
https://www.openprocessing.org/

keyffsmyff

Thanks for these, I have been wanting a circuit simulator and at some point a 3D cad software but hey one thing at a time. 

I have put together a high tech club at my school 3 weeks ago and have over 30 students, now buying the Super Starter kit and sharing various other projects. Thanks to the community for the videos and tutorials it has been a great step up, Having got my son a kit at Christmas and seen the potential. A physics teacher and myself have joined the "video club" and are putting a different slant on things, Link to Playlists. 2 'proper' videos so far and a few short 'this is what you can do' videos. If we are ever allowed back to school and doing clubs (UK) the school have said that they will buy a few more starter kits.

My two pennies for the Education list is of course Scratch for coding. 

ballscrewbob

#3
Feb 17, 2021, 12:30 am Last Edit: Feb 22, 2021, 04:06 pm by ballscrewbob
@keyffsmyff

IMHO scratch is a little outdated in some respects but that may depend on the audience.
Certainly some coding experience is a useful thing to have under your belt regardless.

I would avoid most of the languages that use the block copy paste drop graphical gui types as I find they don't suit the way most real languages are used in practice and can be a little awkward to transition from when moving to a better known language.

It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google (who would have thunk it ! ) or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

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