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Topic: Solenoid lock alternatives  (Read 334 times) previous topic - next topic

notacreativeusername

I'm not sure I know what you mean by spring, but with the regular solenoid lock, I can't keep it active for more than 10 seconds but, I might want to keep the door unlocked/open for 30 minutes or a couple of hours. So I want something that maintains either position (lock or unlock) with no power and for any length of time.

Railroader

Okey. That's different from the picture I had, staying unlocked for that long time.
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No answers given by PM.

Paul__B

I think you will find groundFungus' suggestion the most practical.  These kits are ready-made for exactly the purpose you describe.  You have to provide the mechanical details of a bolt that engages with whatever part it is you need to lock, but you needed to do that anyway and are responsible for ensuring it fits accurately.  A common bolt assembly will probably be suitable.


notacreativeusername

Thank you Paul__B, and groundfungas for the suggestion. Do these pre-made kits have a name to search for? the setup of the motor with worm gear sounds like a linear actuator. Is this the kit you are referring to or is there something else?


Paul__B

Do these pre-made kits have a name to search for? the setup of the motor with worm gear sounds like a linear actuator. Is this the kit you are referring to or is there something else?
Well, Groundfungus gave you a reference to start with.

Some of these car door lock actuators - which are all "linear" actuators - do in fact use a worm gear (as I know, having to replace a broken one on my car), others I think use a "rack and pinion".  In either case however, they allow for manual operation as well, so do not impede movement of the locking arm.  They may drive in one direction and then return to a neutral position and have a loose link with the locking arm to facilitate this.

Note that in order to operate a fairly stiff mechanism and quickly they draw a considerable current - possibly several Amps - which also means they must be strictly prevented from being powered for more than one second or so!

notacreativeusername

Ok thank you for the additional info!

... and thanks to all for your suggestions. 

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