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Topic: 24V 500W Motor - Controller (Read 233 times) previous topic - next topic

arduinick

Hello guys.I bought these 2 motors and I I'm wondering if this controller is a good choice .Is it? Also,I want to know if I can control these 2 motors via PWM with this controller and I also want a diagram/link of connectivity between controller and motors.If anyone can help me ,I would appreciate it.
Thanks a lot !!! :) :)

MarkT

Note its a bike controller, so doesn't reverse and may not have a very linear response as its designed
specifically for one application.

Being this cheap means the build quality may be suspect, but on the plus side its probably weatherproof.

You need a throttle pot typically for such motor controllers - or will have to emulate one.
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gilshultz

I find it is a large power gear motor ZY1020 DC BRUSH permanent magnet motor 36V48V500w700W 800W for electric scooter tools TRICYCLE ATV Buggy. It should work fine but be careful it has a lot of torque. It is a PM motor so PWM should work just fine  From your description you indicated it was a brush motor a big difference from a PM.  The controller you show is at its max for this motor you might consider a larger controller or even build your own. Have fun with the project it will be a great learning experience.
This response is to help you get started in solving your problem, not solve it for you.
Good Luck & Have Fun!
Gil

wvmarle

Rated power: 500W. Rated voltage: 24V. Rated current: 26.7A. That's from the label in the images of that motor listing. Someone has to go back to primary school and re-do their math classes.Those wires also look suspiciously thin for the 20.8A current that 500W/24V implies. Most listings of that motor say it runs at up to 2,500 rpm while the label in the photos says 3,000 rpm.

I guess "rated current" is really stall current, and that 500W a semi-randomly picked number (something that's high enough to sell well but not so high as to be too suspect for the uninformed buyer). Typical for made-in-China products.

Regarding the controller, it's got a lot of connectors - I hope your Chinese is good enough to understand what is what.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

arduinick

#4
Jan 20, 2021, 03:26 pm Last Edit: Jan 20, 2021, 04:34 pm by arduinick
Hello again!!! Can you suggest me a motor driver for this motor(send me link or a name) ?
Thank you.

arduinick

I don't want a potentiometer (for  change speed manually), because I want to change it via my program(code).

MarkT

Rated power: 500W. Rated voltage: 24V. Rated current: 26.7A. That's from the label in the images of that motor listing. Someone has to go back to primary school and re-do their math classes.Those wires also look suspiciously thin for the 20.8A current that 500W/24V implies. Most listings of that motor say it runs at up to 2,500 rpm while the label in the photos says 3,000 rpm.

I guess "rated current" is really stall current, and that 500W a semi-randomly picked number (something that's high enough to sell well but not so high as to be too suspect for the uninformed buyer). Typical for made-in-China products.
The stall current is typically ten times the rated current for a DC motor, otherwise it would be cooking
itself during normal operation.  With the design current about 10% of stall current the windings only
waste 10% of the electrical power to heat, leaving 90% mechanical power.  Of course that size of motor
is probably only good for 200W continuous, ie about 10A, with peaks upto 30A and stall around 100A.

Chinese amps are commonly very different I find (!)
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wvmarle

Hello again!!! Can you suggest me a motor driver for this motor(send me link or a name) ?
Thank you.
Polulu is often mentioned here. DF Robot is another candidate. They offer lots of motor drivers.

Make sure you know the actual specs of your motor (continuous run current under normal load, stall current) and take your pick.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

arduinick

#8
Jan 20, 2021, 06:53 pm Last Edit: Jan 20, 2021, 06:55 pm by arduinick
I had this driver
Before 6 months I tested my 2 motors with this driver with a power supply (output current 1A or 2A & 24V) and the driver was getting very hot and was smoking while I was increasing pwm speed(but finally nothing bad happened to my driver)  .I can't understand why...

Is this driver good for this project (if I don't give maximum current (27,5 A) to my motors) ?

MarkT

I'd always advise choosing something with a good datasheet or documentation, cheap unbranded stuff is often unsatisfactory, poor performing, or sometimes just a ripoff.
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wvmarle

You were obviously overloading your motor driver. The link you post says "10A", you probably have to add heat sinks to those MOSFETs.

If that are indeed IRF3205, on resistance is 8 mOhm so that'd be 800 mW at the rated 10A. That'll get a TO220 without heat sink really hot. If exposed to the air probably not hot enough to break, but it will shorten the life span of the part. With a small heat sink 800 mW is fine, just a good sheet of aluminium screwed to the row of four is most likely enough..

If your motor really runs at ~27A (as long as your power supply can deliver it that's the current you're going to get) they'd be dissipating almost 6W at 100% duty cycle. Not going to last long without a big heat sink, and the PCB layout doesn't really have enough space for that.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

wvmarle

Agreed, you should look at the on resistance.

The part I mentioned (mostly as it happens to be part of my collection of components) is max. 0.05 Ohm at -4.5V Vgs, so at the max 1.5A OP wants to switch it dissipates no more than 112 mW. That's perfectly acceptable for a SOT-23 package without the need for special PCB considerations.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

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