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Topic: Arduino Nano Every Review (Read 169 times) previous topic - next topic

bots_and_thots

I wrote a review for the Arduino Nano Every. I think it could be helpful here.


The Arduino Nano Every is an upgrade to the classic Arduino Nano board. At a cheaper price tag, the Nano Every packs in a more powerful processor, 50% more program memory, 200% more RAM, and much more.

See the full review here if you're interested:
https://mytechbuild.com/2021/02/21/arduino-nano-every/

CrossRoads

"No PWM output"
Except for these 5: 
PWM Pins5 (D3, D5, D6, D9, D10)

https://store.arduino.cc/usa/nano-every
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

bots_and_thots

"No PWM output"
Except for these 5:
PWM Pins5 (D3, D5, D6, D9, D10)

https://store.arduino.cc/usa/nano-every
"No PWM output"
Except for these 5:
PWM Pins5 (D3, D5, D6, D9, D10)

https://store.arduino.cc/usa/nano-every
Thanks for this, not sure how it was missed

david_2018

The clock runs at 16MHz, not 20MHz, although this can be changed fairly easily.  The documentation and even the text on the box is wrong when it states 20MHz.  The clock runs off the internal oscillator instead of a crystal, not good if you need extremely high accuracy.

There are four hardware serial ports, only two of which are available with the Arduino core.  

The program memory and dynamic memory (RAM) occupy a single address space, so there is no need for the use of special PROGMEM instructions, and the compiler will automatically store const values in program memory when possible, freeing up RAM.

Use of MCUdude's MegaCoreX gives you a lot of flexibility, such as easily changing the clock frequency and allowing access to all the serial ports.

pert

The documentation and even the text on the box is wrong when it states 20MHz.
There is a request that the documentation be corrected here:
https://github.com/arduino/Arduino/issues/9017

bots_and_thots

The clock runs at 16MHz, not 20MHz, although this can be changed fairly easily.  The documentation and even the text on the box is wrong when it states 20MHz.  The clock runs off the internal oscillator instead of a crystal, not good if you need extremely high accuracy.

There are four hardware serial ports, only two of which are available with the Arduino core.  

The program memory and dynamic memory (RAM) occupy a single address space, so there is no need for the use of special PROGMEM instructions, and the compiler will automatically store const values in program memory when possible, freeing up RAM.

Use of MCUdude's MegaCoreX gives you a lot of flexibility, such as easily changing the clock frequency and allowing access to all the serial ports.

This is actually nuts. I didn't notice this before.

westfw

It's a pretty sweet chip.
But I'm waiting for the 4809s to be replaced with avr128da32 or similar...

almytom

I've thoroughly studied the Arduino Nano Every and the ATmega4809 and concluded that calling it a new Nano is doing the part a disservice. By forcing the Nano Every to be compatible with the Nano a lot of potential functionality was lost, and there are a few compatibility problems anyway that prevent it from being a drop-in replacement.

The ATmega4809 is really a completely new design but for the instruction set, with none of the new capabilities made available through the Arduino software library. Here is my first review of the part First Look at Arduino Nano Every. I've got some more blog posts about it on my site, and I've written a book discussing the new and different features which is available on Amazon.

pert

Even when it can't be a perfect drop-in replacement, I still think there are merits to using a standardized form factor and pinout. Even the Arduino Micro is compatible with the Nano, though it adds some extra pins. Microchip already sells the reasonably priced ATmega4809 Curiosity Nano with all the pins broken out, so Arduino wouldn't have offered anything to the community by creating a similar board, but with the Nano, they created some thing new and useful, and with a super hook-up price as well!

The Uno/Leonardo/Mega/Uno WiFi Rev2/Due/Zero form factor is a bit large for a lot of applications and not breadboard friendly, but the ability to use shields that comes from this standarization is really great. Even though I haven't used them in many of my finished projects, I find I absolutely love shields when it comes to my support and testing work. It's really a time savings to be able to avoid breadboarding up a circuit, do a quick test or verify an answer, then tear the whole thing back down.

The standardized Nano form factor offers another chance for us to accomplish this, but with a better design this time. Even though there are not the huge number of pre-made shield/motherboards as for the Uno ecosystem, the on-grid pin layout of the Nano makes it very easy to make your own. I've taken to using passthrough headers on my prototyping Nano factor boards to allow me to use them on a breadboard and with a shield at the same time.

With the announcement of the usage of the Nano factor for their RP2040 board, Arduino is showing indications that they are going to continue to use this factor where appropriate.

Of course there is also the newer MKR factor, which offers a bit more board real estate while still providing breadboard compatibility, and Arduino has also provided a nice selection of shields for this factor. I think it's good to have the two, since the super compact Nano is ideal, but it also could be limiting in some cases where it's simply not possible to fit all the desired functionality into such a small board.

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