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Topic: Arduino Nano Every Review (Read 104 times) previous topic - next topic

bots_and_thots

I wrote a review for the Arduino Nano Every. I think it could be helpful here.


The Arduino Nano Every is an upgrade to the classic Arduino Nano board. At a cheaper price tag, the Nano Every packs in a more powerful processor, 50% more program memory, 200% more RAM, and much more.

See the full review here if you're interested:
https://mytechbuild.com/2021/02/21/arduino-nano-every/

CrossRoads

"No PWM output"
Except for these 5: 
PWM Pins5 (D3, D5, D6, D9, D10)

https://store.arduino.cc/usa/nano-every
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

bots_and_thots

"No PWM output"
Except for these 5:
PWM Pins5 (D3, D5, D6, D9, D10)

https://store.arduino.cc/usa/nano-every
"No PWM output"
Except for these 5:
PWM Pins5 (D3, D5, D6, D9, D10)

https://store.arduino.cc/usa/nano-every
Thanks for this, not sure how it was missed

david_2018

The clock runs at 16MHz, not 20MHz, although this can be changed fairly easily.  The documentation and even the text on the box is wrong when it states 20MHz.  The clock runs off the internal oscillator instead of a crystal, not good if you need extremely high accuracy.

There are four hardware serial ports, only two of which are available with the Arduino core.  

The program memory and dynamic memory (RAM) occupy a single address space, so there is no need for the use of special PROGMEM instructions, and the compiler will automatically store const values in program memory when possible, freeing up RAM.

Use of MCUdude's MegaCoreX gives you a lot of flexibility, such as easily changing the clock frequency and allowing access to all the serial ports.

pert

The documentation and even the text on the box is wrong when it states 20MHz.
There is a request that the documentation be corrected here:
https://github.com/arduino/Arduino/issues/9017

bots_and_thots

The clock runs at 16MHz, not 20MHz, although this can be changed fairly easily.  The documentation and even the text on the box is wrong when it states 20MHz.  The clock runs off the internal oscillator instead of a crystal, not good if you need extremely high accuracy.

There are four hardware serial ports, only two of which are available with the Arduino core.  

The program memory and dynamic memory (RAM) occupy a single address space, so there is no need for the use of special PROGMEM instructions, and the compiler will automatically store const values in program memory when possible, freeing up RAM.

Use of MCUdude's MegaCoreX gives you a lot of flexibility, such as easily changing the clock frequency and allowing access to all the serial ports.

This is actually nuts. I didn't notice this before.

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