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Topic: Perfboard for a noob. (Read 7539 times) previous topic - next topic

retrolefty


Hmm, never tried soldering 30 guage, only wirewrapped that small. Not sure how the insulation would hold up with heat when there is so little of it.

This might work, look around see if you have similar handy.

http://www.dipmicro.com/store/WIRE24


I've been soldering wire-wrap wire for decades, it's my standard wiring method using hole per pad protoboards. The insulation is very strong and holds up well to the soldering heat. 30 gage wire has such small mass so it takes very little time to solder to a pad. The biggest thing about using wire wrap wire is to have a purpose designed wire stripper or you will have problems with nicked wires that can easily break off after soldering.

Lefty

CrossRoads

After I discovered wirewrapping, I never went back to point to point wiring. Wirewrap is great for digital, and twisted-pair/coax for analog signals.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

retrolefty


After I discovered wirewrapping, I never went back to point to point wiring. Wirewrap is great for digital, and twisted-pair/coax for analog signals.


I too did a lot of building using wirewrap sockets in the past. However now a days the prices of wirewrap sockets are pretty dear and not real compatible with 'hobby budgets'. At one time I use to be able to buy large surplus logic boards that might contain hundreds of 14 and 16 pin WW sockets for a song, but haven't seen such offering in years.

Lefty


CrossRoads

I don't use sockets either. I buy strips of pins like this and cut off what I need.
Works great for a Promini, which is too wide for a standard 0.6" wide 24 pin socket.

5 cents a pin that way, cheaper than a socket.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

retrolefty


I don't use sockets either. I buy strips of pins like this and cut off what I need.
Works great for a Promini, which is too wide for a standard 0.6" wide 24 pin socket.

5 cents a pin that way, cheaper than a socket.


That is a great method, I guess I just never came up with a source for 'strip pins'.


CrossRoads

Oops, forgot the link
http://www.king-cart.com/cgi-bin/cart.cgi?store=phoenixent&product_name=HWS15765
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

dc42

I've used wire wrap, stripboard (http://3dreplicators.com/New%20Front%20Page/Documentation/Tools/Stripboard%20designer.htm) and Vero Wire (http://www.verotl.com/vero-wire) for prototyping and 1-off designs. For mixed analog and digital designs, I prefer stripboard. It takes up a little more space than perfboard but is easier to wire. Also it is easier to change components and make minor modifications to the design, because you don't have to unsolder all the wires going to a pin, you just unsolder the component you want to change.

For mostly digital designs I have found Vero Wire vastly superior to anything else. It's extremely quick to wire up. Making modifications isn't as easy as with stripboard but not too difficult either.
Formal verification of safety-critical software, software development, and electronic design and prototyping. See http://www.eschertech.com. Please do not ask for unpaid help via PM, use the forum.

marzetti

I've tried a number of different prototype boards but like stripboard the best. I use Eagle to design my circuits then do my board design with the strips on the bottom layer and the connecting wires on the top layer. I mark the locations where the strips are to be cut with a hole symbol. When the board design is complete I print the mirror image and glue it to the strip side of the board with spray adhesive and then cut the strips at the hole symbol. With my printer I had to do a bit of fiddling with the x and y scale to get everything to line up properly. After the strips are cut the paper is removed and I clean the adhesive off before soldering. It sounds complicated but is very easy in practice.
Can anyone tell me where to find the little tool to cut the tracks on stripboard? I've been using an exacto knife but it's a bit of a pain (literally if you slip and cut yourself!)

dc42


I've tried a number of different prototype boards but like stripboard the best. I use Eagle to design my circuits then do my board design with the strips on the bottom layer and the connecting wires on the top layer.


There are also some free design programs for stripboard such as VeroDes http://www.heyrick.co.uk/software/verodes/.


Can anyone tell me where to find the little tool to cut the tracks on stripboard? I've been using an exacto knife but it's a bit of a pain (literally if you slip and cut yourself!)


If you're cutting the tracks at a hole position, then the tool you need is called a "spot face cutter" and you can find suppliers via Google. A 1/8" or 3.2mm HSS drill held in your fingers works nearly as well.
Formal verification of safety-critical software, software development, and electronic design and prototyping. See http://www.eschertech.com. Please do not ask for unpaid help via PM, use the forum.

ajofscott

Its a good use for one of those .025 carbide bits that broke off, the little bit of auger left by the shank makes a nice little mill bit for the dremmel.

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