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Topic: Your latest purchase (Read 522049 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

Wire-wrapping on a breadboard? I'm confused; isn't the diameter too thin for that?
Most breadboard signal runs are less than 3-4 inches, 30 AWG has a current rating of 500mA.

For higher current signals I use 24-20 AWG wire.



See:
https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=445951.0;attach=195518




 

No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
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sterretje

Ah, does not look like a breadboard to me ;)
If you understand an example, use it.
If you don't understand an example, don't use it.

Electronics engineer by trade, software engineer by profession. Trying to get back into electronics after 15 years absence.

larryd

#2267
Nov 15, 2019, 04:42 pm Last Edit: Nov 15, 2019, 04:46 pm by larryd
Google:   Solder-able breadboard          youngster   :)







No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

sterretje

In my days it had another name. But I'm too old to remember :D

Vero board, stripboard or something like that.
If you understand an example, use it.
If you don't understand an example, don't use it.

Electronics engineer by trade, software engineer by profession. Trying to get back into electronics after 15 years absence.

groundFungus

Without the solder pads, perfboard.

GoForSmoke

Got 2 of these from Amazon:

WESIRI WS2811 Diffused Digital RGB LED Pixel Lights Green Wire Individually Addressable Round DIY LED Pixels Module IP68 Waterproof DC5V 50pcs/Set

They work great and are easy to wire up, bulbs are 12mm dia. The string has 3 wires (all green for this one for tree/wreath use) that I had to look at a bulb PCB to know which is 5V, Data, GND. Connected 5V and GND to a 60W 5V supply, grounded an Uno to same and ran pin 7 to led string Data and that was it. Loaded a sketch and it ran.

It says power 0.3W per led, 15W for the strip. That must be max power, all bulbs blazing white.. I think.

0.3W for 3 junctions, 0.1W each at 5V is 20mA. Sounds about right. At half-power the bulbs glow bright even in a lit room with the diffused bulbs, really nice.

There's about 75mm/3" length between bulbs. The wires can be cut and spliced, probably easier than cut/splice led strip.
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

GoForSmoke

In my days it had another name. But I'm too old to remember :D

Vero board, stripboard or something like that.
Protoboard?
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

wilykat

MAX7219 and 8x8 LED matrix.  About time I tried this for handling crapload of LED with just 3 pins.



Now if I can get the library to work with ATTiny10 I could deadbug it on top of MAX chip.

GoForSmoke

I have 2 WS2811 led strings with 50 12mm bulbs each that can join and be 100 RGB leds that I run with one pin.

For less than $15, 50 RGB leds and WS2811 controllers all wired up correctly... how many hours would it take to do that for less in parts?

Led strip works the same way.

1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

ranjit-ao

#2274
Nov 21, 2019, 07:03 pm Last Edit: Nov 21, 2019, 07:16 pm by ranjit-ao
Nothing special, but I went ahead and got some of the basics considering I am now doing these kinds of things as hobby for the first time since moving rather than at work - no more fancy workshop to use, but freedom to work on my own projects this time. :)

El cheapo temperature adjustable soldering iron (which should hopefully work long enough until I can find my nice old one that seems to have vanished), various colors and sizes of wire, connectors, crimpers, diodes, capacitors, LEDs, resistors, three new breadboards and so on.

Also, a comic book as a gift.

Robin2

I've been building some model trains with battery power and radio control (nRF24) using Kato N-gauge chassis (which are intended for 12v). I have been persisting for some months just powering them directly from a small 1S LiPo (3.7v). Some days they work well in one direction, not so good in the other.

I finally got sense and bought some MT3608 voltage step-up modules and the performance is hugely better just running the motor at 5v (and with the Attiny and nRF24 running directly off the LiPo (with a diode to drop the voltage for the nRF24). I may even reduce the voltage to 4.5v as I don't need the train to go so fast.

But yesterday was one of those days!  I let one of the modules fall on the floor and the ferrite around the coil broke. And then I put the battery in the wrong way round and the smoke escaped from another module instantly. Just as well that the modules are cheap. :)

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

westfw

#2276
Today at 03:32 am Last Edit: Today at 03:32 am by westfw
More Arduinos!
I might have been feeling a bit guilty about the low count of "genuine" boards in my collection.
These were ordered directly from the Arduino Store...

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