1 MCU 8 Electromagnets each should work both polarity

Hi Everyone!
I have to control 8 electromagnets very accurately. I've already got the coils, they are rated at:
5vDC, 72mA, 70 Ohm.

My goal is to be able to control each of them with PWM signals, not just one polarity, but each should be able to create North or South magnetic field, without turning the coils manually.

The other thing is, that I have to use a PWM expander, to save up pins for other parts of the project. The TLC5940 IC looks great, because it is able to source current up to 120mA / output pin. (if a understood the datasheet correctly)

So my question is that is it possible to flip the polarity of the electromagnets without using an H-Bridge, just connected both terminals of a coil to two PWM outputs of the TLC5940, and writing 0% duty cycle to one output, and 100% duty cycle to the other, and when it needed vice versa?

Or if it's not the correct way to do it, could anyone recommend me some good H-Bridge IC for this project, or any other solutions?

Thanks in advance,
Adam

No, you need, somehow, to make or use h-bridges.

The TLC5940 IC looks great, because it is able to source current up to 120mA / output pin. (if a understood the datasheet correctly)

No offence, but you have not understood correctly. This chip's outputs can only sink 120mA, they cannot source any current at all. You need to study and understand basic concepts of "source" and "sink". To make North and South magnetic fields, you must use a circuits/pins capable of both sourcing and sinking. To make a North magnetic field, you need to source current to one side of the coil and sink current from the other. To make a South magnetic field, you need to do the opposite. So the pins connected to either side of the coil must be able to source and/or sink current when required. If you have circuits that can do this, that is precisely what is meant by the term "h-bridge".

If you only need to make North or South magnetic fields, why do you need to use PWM?

My suggestion might be too use a chip such as UDN2981. This is a high-side driver, capable of sourcing higher currents than Arduino outputs. Its 8 inputs could be connected to 8 outputs of tlc5940, if pull-up resistors are also added. This combination of chips could give you 8 h-bridges. The problem with that idea is that the UDN chip had quite a high voltage drop, which might mean not enough voltage for your coils. But it might work well enough.