100 Ft Infrared "Trip Wire" System

Hello,
I am looking at creating an infrared tripwire system. I am planning on using a 555 or Arduino Nano to pulse an IR led at 38kHz and I will have another Arduino detecting this with an IR receiver. I am wondering if anyone has suggestions on what receiver I should use? I'm assuming it will have to be a receiver built to receive a continuous input. Would something like this work? Basically I want to be able to detect when something comes between the emitter and receiver at a range of 100ft (30M). Is this a reasonable goal? I would strongly appreciate any suggestions, tips, or advice, and sorry if I did something wrong as this is my first post.

I think many sensors could work, but an IR LED might not be reliable enough in daylight. I'd use a laser for that distance. Detecting the laser can be tricky with a small target like an LDR or an IR receiver, if either end gets bumped. To make that kind of setup reliable would mean having solid mounts on Tx and Rx. And possibly a lens or reflector to help catch the laser beam if it moves by a centimeter or more.

I once made a laser tripwire covering about 5m. It was received by an LDR connected to a video game controller button, so a PC could sense it (before I knew about microcontrolers). It seemed to work ok without a lens on the receiver, but wasn't very far apart and it wasn't tested over time

carterj:
I am wondering if anyone has suggestions on what receiver I should use?

A TSS (not TSOP) receiver is designed for constant (not intermittent) IR.
One with a round lens (TSS4038) might be preferred.
Then opening angle is more uniform horizontally and vertically.

Must use a narrow-beam IR LED for that distance.

Made one with an SMD CMOS 555 and a constant current (mosfet) driver.
Two LEDs for more efficient use of the single LiPo battery.
60 metres (200 feet) in broad daylight was not a big problem.
Leo..

PS
Lasers are a pain to align, and you can see them.
Which makes them a poor choice for a (security) tripwire.

Wawa:
A TSS (not TSOP) receiver is designed for constant (not intermittent) IR.
One with a round lens (TSS4038) might be preferred.
Then opening angle is more uniform horizontally and vertically.

Must use a narrow-beam IR LED for that distance.

Made one with an SMD CMOS 555 and a constant current (mosfet) driver.
Two LEDs for more efficient use of the single LiPo battery.
60 metres (200 feet) in broad daylight was not a big problem.
Leo..

PS
Lasers are a pain to align, and you can see them.
Which makes them a poor choice for a (security) tripwire.

Where would you suggest I order a TSSP4038 from? It looks like digikey, LCSC and mouser are out of stock / have a long fulfillment time. Also, I have these IR LED's already, do you think they would work for distances up to 100ft? Im probably going to use up to three LED's.
Thanks for the help!

Ordered mine from RS components.

Must use LEDs with full datasheet/specifications if you want to be certain to bridge that distance.
One 10 degree narrow beam LED might do the same distance as a dozen or more unspecified wide-angle remote control or security camera floodlight LEDs. Too much light is wasted with common wide-angle LEDs.

Should also use a constant current source for the LED string. They can't sustain more than ~100mA average continuously without damage. I used 120mA/50%/38kHz (60mA average).

Can use the sensor you linked to. It's just a bit more sensitive to the sides.
Not a big deal. You must use it in a short/black tube anyway, to keep direct (sun) light out.
No need to shield the IR LEDs, unless you also use the setup for short distances.
IR light bounces off everything, and can reach the sensor that way.
Leo..

A plastic straw might be about right for the receiver tube. Paint the outside black with marker.

Wawa:
Ordered mine from RS components.

Must use LEDs with full datasheet/specifications if you want to be certain to bridge that distance.
One 10 degree narrow beam LED might do the same distance as a dozen or more unspecified wide-angle remote control or security camera floodlight LEDs. Too much light is wasted with common wide-angle LEDs.

Should also use a constant current source for the LED string. They can't sustain more than ~100mA average continuously without damage. I used 120mA/50%/38kHz (60mA average).

Can use the sensor you linked to. It's just a bit more sensitive to the sides.
Not a big deal. You must use it in a short/black tube anyway, to keep direct (sun) light out.
No need to shield the IR LEDs, unless you also use the setup for short distances.
IR light bounces off everything, and can reach the sensor that way.
Leo..

Thanks for all the info,
I might just have to wait a bit to get these sensors since it looks like RS Components is out of stock aswell. I am going to custom 3D print a case for the system and probably power it with 4-5 AA Batteries. Would it be reasonable to hope for 1ms accuracy?

ShermanP:
A plastic straw might be about right for the receiver tube. Paint the outside black with marker.

Too cumbersome, and not needed.
With a long/thin tube you will have problems aiming it.
1cm (1/2") diameter and 5cm (2") long should enough for the receiver.

carterj:
Would it be reasonable to hope for 1ms accuracy?

A 5mm LED has a 5mm diameter 'beam'. More LEDs means more beams.
So a vertical LED array must be used for a sports trip line.
Optics means a 'thicker' beam. Not good for a sports tripwire.
Reaction time of modulated IR should be better than 1/1000 sec.
You can calculate the distance the object/person has travelled after blocking the beam.
Leo..

IR can also be upset by rain scattering or absorbing the signal, you’ll need to check for that.

hammy:
IR can also be upset by rain scattering or absorbing the signal, you’ll need to check for that.

Probably wont ever be in the rain