12v / 6amps to arduino barrel jack

Good Eve. Just would like ask if it is ok if I use a 12V / 6A connected directly to the Arduino barrel jack? :slight_smile:

There is a reverse voltage protection diode in the circuit rated ONE Amp and the circuit traces on the board could never carry 6 Amps, so as long as you don't draw more than about 800 mA. What are you planning to power through the barrel jack?

JCA34F:
There is a reverse voltage protection diode in the circuit rated ONE Amp and the circuit traces on the board could never carry 6 Amps, so NO.

If I will use a buck converter? Will it work? If not. How much amp does an Arduino uno can take?

A buck converter set to an output voltage of 5 volts and connected to the 5v pin of the Arduino will work (assuming that the Arduino is a 5volt device like say a Uno).

What 6Amp load do you intend to connect to this ?

Sorry, check my edited previous post, I would not try to draw more than 600 ~ 800 mA total from 5V, 3.3V and output pins. If you need greater than that at 5V, then, yes, a 12 ~ 5V buck converter of suitable current rating.

Uh, if you are referring to plugging in a 12v 6a supply into the Arduino’s barrel jack that is perfectly acceptable. The Arduino will not draw any more current that it needs to operate.

These are handy for splitting out power from a barrel connector (of the CORRECT size, 5.5 x 2.1 mm).

Qdeathstar:
Uh, if you are referring to plugging in a 12v 6a supply into the Arduino’s barrel jack that is perfectly acceptable. The Arduino will not draw any more current that it needs to operate.

Yes that is correct. 12v 6a directly into the Arduino's barrel jack.

JCA34F:
These are handy for splitting out power from a barrel connector (of the CORRECT size).
https://www.amazon.com/Chanzon-Female-Connector-Security-Adapter/dp/B079RCNNCK/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=5V+plug+adapter+screw+terminal&qid=1578755538&sr=8-1

6v6gt:
A buck converter set to an output voltage of 5 volts and connected to the 5v pin of the Arduino will work (assuming that the Arduino is a 5volt device like say a Uno).

What 6Amp load do you intend to connect to this ?

This is the other option I have in mind if it is not possible to connect the 12v 6a directly to the Arduino uno's barrel jack. I am planning to connect (1)12v computer fan, (2) led lights, (1) 5v buck converter going Arduino uno's barrel jack using this adapter screw terminal.

KyleFrancis:
This is the other option I have in mind if it is not possible to connect the 12v 6a directly to the Arduino uno's barrel jack. I am planning to connect (1)12v computer fan, (2) led lights, (1) 5v buck converter going Arduino uno's barrel jack using this adapter screw terminal.

What are the power requirements of the LED lights (volts/amps) ?

You have talked about 6 Amps. If you are using the Arduino's (linear) regulator to drop the 12 volts to 5 volts, you can't connect power hungry external peripherals without it getting too hot.

6v6gt:
What are the power requirements of the LED lights (volts/amps) ?

You have talked about 6 Amps. If you are using the Arduino's (linear) regulator to drop the 12 volts to 5 volts, you can't connect power hungry external peripherals without it getting too hot.

Just a 5mm led lights probably 2-5 lights. 3v 20mA. Like for example 12V 1a computer fan. and 2-5 led light 5mm 3v 20mA then a buck converter going to arduino uno's jack barrel. I'am also planning to run it like 24hrs.

KyleFrancis:
Just a 5mm led lights probably 2-5 lights. 3v 20mA. Like for example 12V 1a computer fan. and 2-5 led light 5mm 3v 20mA then a buck converter going to arduino uno's jack barrel. I'am also planning to run it like 24hrs.

That is a small load (100mA) that is to be powered via the Arduino.
If you use the barrel jack, the voltage input has to be at least 7 volts, but the neared to 7 volts, the better to minimise regulator heat dissipation. With your proposed load of 100mA through the Uno, however, this is not such a problem.
If you use the +5v pin to power the Uno, the voltage must be exactly 5 volts because this does not go through the regulator.
Are you going to control the 12 volt fan from the Arduino ? If so, you'll need a relay module or transistor/mosfet.

6v6gt:
That is a small load (100mA) that is to be powered via the Arduino.
If you use the barrel jack, the voltage input has to be at least 7 volts, but the neared to 7 volts, the better to minimise regulator heat dissipation. With your proposed load of 100mA through the Uno, however, this is not such a problem.
If you use the +5v pin to power the Uno, the voltage must be exactly 5 volts because this does not go through the regulator.
Are you going to control the 12 volt fan from the Arduino ? If so, you'll need a relay module or transistor/mosfet.

So meaning to say 12v 6a is to much for the arduino. If I will be using the barrel jack?

I will connect the jack of the 12v 6a adaptor to the jack barrel of the arduino directly that's the initial plan,
but if it is not possible then I will use a buck converter to convert it to 5v then connect it to the barrel jack of the arduino. In that way the arduino will only get 5v from the buck converter. For the led lights I might connect it directly to the arduino pins since it will only consume less power. For the 12v fan yes I will be connecting it to the arduino to activate the relay module and power the 12v fan directly on the 12v adaptor.

Will that be a yes? Can I use the 12v 6a adaptor directly to the jack barrel of the arduino. OR

From the 12v 6a going to the buck converter then to the barrel jack of the arduino?

KyleFrancis:
So meaning to say 12v 6a is to much for the arduino. If I will be using the barrel jack?

No, no, no.
This whole thread has gone way off track.

Start from the beginning.
You can plug the arduino into a 12V, 100Amp source, like a car battery, but the Arduino will only take what it needs.

The Arduino will only use the current it needs. Period.

Add up the current requirements of all of your devices. Are they 12V or 5V devices? Give us this data then we can recommend something specific to your project.

Now, where the thread went off track.
The Arduino is a 5V device. The barrel jack is only a convenience with a 5V regulator built in on the board. The on-board regulator is a linear device, meaning that it literally burns off the excess voltage (everything over 5V) as heat. Not something that you want running 24/7, though I have done it on some projects. This is where you are getting advice to power the Arduino with 5V.

So, provide the total voltage (5V or 12V) requirements of your external devices. Con't tell the story of each device, just the total current requirements. Then you can get some solid suggestions.

SteveMann:
No, no, no.
This whole thread has gone way off track.

Start from the beginning.
You can plug the arduino into a 12V, 100Amp source, like a car battery, but the Arduino will only take what it needs.

The Arduino will only use the current it needs. Period.

Add up the current requirements of all of your devices. Are they 12V or 5V devices? Give us this data then we can recommend something specific to your project.

Now, where the thread went off track.
The Arduino is a 5V device. The barrel jack is only a convenience with a 5V regulator built in on the board. The on-board regulator is a linear device, meaning that it literally burns off the excess voltage (everything over 5V) as heat. Not something that you want running 24/7, though I have done it on some projects. This is where you are getting advice to power the Arduino with 5V.

So, provide the total voltage (5V or 12V) requirements of your external devices. Con't tell the story of each device, just the total current requirements. Then you can get some solid suggestions.

Thanks for the confirmation. Very nice.

SteveMann:
So, provide the total voltage (5V or 12V) requirements of your external devices. Con't tell the story of each device, just the total current requirements. Then you can get some solid suggestions.

The external device That I will be using is a 12v cpu fan. 2-5pcs. of led lights 3v, i2c lcd and an sd card module.

KyleFrancis:
Thanks for the confirmation. Very nice.

The external device That I will be using is a 12v cpu fan. 2-5pcs. of led lights 3v, i2c lcd and an sd card module.

What is the total current requirement?

SteveMann:
What is the total current requirement?

Ok this is the part that is confusing to me. I tried to google it and I'am not sure if I understand it correctly.

When you say current are we referring to the total amps?

I'am totally new to this. I don't know how to get the total numbers of current. Unless it is printed on the device itself :frowning:

Here's my little advice!

Measure the actual voltage of your power supply. Many times 12V is actually much higher, and that with capable of 6A current is making even more heat on the onboard regulator. Usually power supplies are build to to give more voltage which drops closer to given numbers under load. If the load is not enough, voltage stays high.

I don't know what is the maximum input voltage of your Arduino, but be sure you don't exceed that.

Multimeter is your friend. Measure first, plug in only if not too high voltage. Forget the current.

Cheers,
Kari

Measure...

To help make the points a bit more concrete, I've tried to draw a schematic based on my interpretation of what you have said.

If the fan has only a small power requirement (mA), this may work. Does it look like what you want to achieve ?

Click to enlarge, depending on your browser:

GaryP:
Here's my little advice!

Measure the actual voltage of your power supply. Many times 12V is actually much higher, and that with capable of 6A current is making even more heat on the onboard regulator. Usually power supplies are build to to give more voltage which drops closer to given numbers under load. If the load is not enough, voltage stays high.

I don't know what is the maximum input voltage of your Arduino, but be sure you don't exceed that.

Multimeter is your friend. Measure first, plug in only if not too high voltage. Forget the current.

Cheers,
Kari

Measure...

Meaning 12V 6a is to much if there is not much load on the board. Though it may work but it will generate more heat? Since there's so much of an excess current? Am I getting it right? Thank you so much for taking time to :slight_smile: