12v power distribution box in garage

I'm going to made some projects in my double garage and therefore i thinking about to make an 12v "Distribution sentral" witch is a box with 10-15x outputs that i can use for powering arduino projects, maybe som roof lighting etc.

Some ideas how i start regards to get enough power?

Should i use an standard Power adapter witch is 12v 8amp that gives main power to that box? All my arduino projects that i'm going to add using from 3.3 to 5 volt and have own circuits for voltage regulation.

Some ideas around that, and maybe some tios and tricks?

Only you can determine what enough power is!

When you do that, then you can determine the current needed. Then you can determine the power loss in the wires you are using. Then you will know how much power/voltage you need at the power supply.

Paul

Yes, i know that.

But is use of an power adapter the way to go, or is it better to place an 12v power supply in the garage?

Some random tips and tricks regards to the project is also welcome.

Bjerknez:
Yes, i know that.

But is use of an power adapter the way to go, or is it better to place an 12v power supply in the garage?

Some random tips and tricks regards to the project is also welcome.

Tips and tricks? I don't know why anyone would do what you are considering. If I need something other than 120VAC, I plug in an appropriate PSU.

Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
Tips and tricks? I don't know why anyone would do what you are considering. If I need something other than 120VAC, I plug in an appropriate PSU.

Paul

Ok, but why is this not an good idea? If i over time will mount several micro controllers in garage, i then have an ready power for it, instead of use an 5V dapter eatch time and take up all my 220V outlet space.

I can also mount roof lamps that goes on 12V and power 5v and 3V devices etc.

Here in Norway we have not aloved to make changes in 220V circuits. Therefore i want to use 12V. I can then do whatever i want.

12V is tricky as wire length causes much more significant voltage drop and there is a risk of fire. In general devices for domestic use that need 12v convert the ac close to the required use. I am rewiring a boat and the thickness of wire required is telling. Things that you could power in a house with a tiny cable need beefy cables as thick as your little finger. If you are playing with arduino get a PSU that is adjustable. Otherwise you need to be careful. There is a reason why AC won over DC for home electrics and 220V over 12.

First of all, as others have mentioned, you need define your power requirements.
Based on that you can then size the power supply, cabling and also provide overcurrent protection with appropriately sized fuses.

12V DC is the standard voltage for CCTV cameras.
You might consider something like THIS:

Each circuit is individually fused so that you can choose fuses accordingly. You can even parallel outputs for more power.

I think maybe it is some misunderstanding here. I sed earlier that i already have 220V in the garage. The cable from 220V outlet to this box i talk about is maybe 1 meter (at the most).

So instead of using several power adapter and use all my 220V outlets in garage, i think it’s better to make one 12V box where i can get power to all my low power projects.

Bjerknez:
I think maybe it is some misunderstanding here. I sed earlier that i already have 220V in the garage. The cable from 220V outlet to this box i talk about is maybe 1 meter (at the most).

So instead of using several power adapter and use all my 220V outlets in garage, i think it's better to make one 12V box where i can get power to all my low power projects.

This is exactly why i suggested the above module.
You just plug it into one of your mains outlets and you have 8 or even 16 12v individual outputs.

All my Arduino projects that I'm going to add using from 3.3 to 5 volt and have own circuits for voltage regulation.

If you mean you will rely on the on board regulators then I suggest you change your design to include a 12V to 5V buck converter for each project, mounted close to the board that needs the power. The linear regulators that come with Arduinos just convert the excess voltage to heat, so 7/12 of the power going in to the board is wasted. If you use a buck converter they 'swap' voltage for current, with the result that much less is wasted as heat.

Yes, that was my plan from start. I have a lot of buck and buck/boost convertes i can use.

You might find this DC ring circuit of interest to what you are doing.

I use individual PSUs for each of my projects.

Buying one big mother of a PSU may be ok this month, but maybe become unsuitable say 6 months down the line.
You can't predict the future. As you progress, your skills and methods will change. What is a good idea now could (will) get replaced with a better idea in a few months time.

I bought a load of '3 pin plug' type PSUs from Asia (dirt cheap). I break them up and extract the PSU boards. I use the PSU boards in conjunction with DC-DC converters to power my projects (arduinos, relays, leds, solenoids, sensors etc).

Maybe after you have constructed 10 projects around the garage, you will then be in a better position to decide on a central PSU, and figure out how it will integrate with everything.

Steve

What do you mean with individual PCU’s? Do you mean for example an own power adapter for each project?

My biggest concern is to use one 220V outlet plug for every projects. I just have totally four in my garage and two of them is allready in use.

I’m not going to build respirators for humans. If my main and only PSU not wor any more, it’s just to buy a new one.

Btw. Here is my last design and Schematic for the board.

I would have a means to disconnect each output, possibly a switch and/or a fuse, and an LED for each output.

Bjerknez:
What do you mean with individual PCU’s? Do you mean for example an own power adapter for each project?

Yes. I salvaged the PSU boards from the adapters,to save space, and incorporated the PSU boards in boxes and enclosures along with the Arduino boards and other electronics.
Also, some projects required more than 12V.

I personally have found it easier to provide multiple 240V supplies to the various Arduino controlled devices around the workshop.That worked for me.

Just throwing in some ideas.

Steve

Another suggestion is to install mains sockets with built in USB power outlets.

No affiliation here:
http://www.westmountainradio.com/rigrunner.php

If I were to do this I would take Perry's suggestion and run a DC Ring circuit. I would run adequate gauge wire around in a ring front, back and sides. Just use a more than adequate power supply for your needs. As to drop connectors or branch connectors whatever will handle your needs. Run drops at whatever distance you choose. Use single gang (or double gang) boxes at the drops. Just get cover blanks and knockout for whatever connectors you want which will handle your intended loads. Not to overlook fuses!

The hardware in all of this is just a matter of your wants/needs.

Ron