12V unregulated power supply for Arduino Mini Pro?

Is a 12V 500mA unregulated power supply suitable for powering an Arduino Mini Pro board? Or would it just end up frying the board? Being an unregulated power supply i guess it'll give more than 12V.

I am not familiar with what power regulator is on the mini pro, but on my bare bones board it takes a heat sink on a full sized 7805 to run a unregulated 12v power supply with any load on it

I am currently using a 9v 1amp switching supply which by nature is somewhat regulated, and its very small (compared to my brick 1 amp 12 volt), and since its from a old cel phone it was free (or a couple bucks at a thrift store) and since the regulator is so small on the mini, I would even look for a bit lower, keeping the regulators min voltage in mind

[edit]excuse me its a phillips so it came from my dead razor @ westfw: among other things if you use your imagination, or at least endless 4 digit 7 segment led displays in the form of old alarm clocks [/edit]

Thrift stores seem to be a great source of old cellphone/etc AC adapters that make fine Arduino power supplies.

Have a read of:-
http://www.thebox.myzen.co.uk/Tutorial/Power_Supplies.html

http://www.thebox.myzen.co.uk/Tutorial/Power.html

and

http://www.thebox.myzen.co.uk/Tutorial/Power_Examples.html

That gives you an introduction into the things you need to know.

I do understand the basics on power supplies, but I don't fully understand the specifications of the board. It reads:

"Input Voltage 3.35 -12 V (3.3V model) or 5 - 12 V (5V model)"

And then: "The Arduino Pro Mini can be powered with [...] an unregulated supply on the RAW pin."

So the question is, will it handle an unregulated 12V power supply (meaning it will receive more than 12V)? Or do i otherwise need to keep the voltage lower or equal to 12V at all times? (which wouldn't be the case with an unregulated 12V p.s.)

Also note that I'm actually planning on buying tens to hundreds of power supplies and that I'm amplifying some of Arduino's outputs to 10V. So going for lower voltage power supplies or searching on the garage for some old device is a no-no.

So to sum it up, it would be great if you could give me a straight answer to my first question.

So to sum it up, it would be great if you could give me a straight answer to my first question.

sorry to have wasted your time, look at the regulator and google the data shet

Phew, I finally got the answer!

The problem was that all that shows on the pro mini schematics is a ###V next to what i guess is the power regulator.

After googling a bit i ended up on another post on these forums, which gave me the answer.

I'll copy the info here, just in case someone else is on the same situation. The model is: MIC5205-5.0YM5, Relevent datasheet: http://www.micrel.com/_PDF/mic5205.pdf

Oh, and it seems it can operate up to 16V :D

well back to my original post, that all depends

it regulates power by dissipating it as heat, the more you put in the more it heats up, the more load you put on it, the more it heats up

there is a thermal threshold in the mix you need to be aware of

I've watched the tiny regulator on the Pro Mini produce a very impressive amount of smoke. I'd have never dreamed they could fit that much smoke into that tiny chip. That "thermal threshold" matters.

Oh, and it seems it can operate up to 16V

It also depends on the voltage rating of C19 as well as the regulator. If this is only rated at 12V then that is the limit.

Also note that I'm actually planning on buying tens to hundreds of power supplies

My advice would be to purchase just one first.

A good thread here - illustrates what can sound like a very simple yes or no question..... really isn't.. all depends is almost as good an answer possible.

I can also see the fustration of a person who asks the question because they usually don't understand the "all depends"- just how many different things can come into play for the answer.

Ken H.