16x32 RGB (WS2815) LED Array Powering Concerns

Hello!
Ive been working to design a table with an LED lit top that can be programmed with an arduino to do show different animations. The goal is to have it be 16x32 LEDs over 2x5ft.

At first I believed this could be done using LED matrices but with this large number of LEDs. After doing some research I now believe using 16 or so shift regulators and multiplexing is not viable with an Arduino.

I think that using 12VDC WS2815, Individually Addressable LEDs, is the best way to go for this many LEDs
Data Sheet:
http://www.normandled.com/upload/201808/WS2815%20LED%20Datasheet.pdf

I plan to cut them apart and wire them together using 1.5mm (just to be safe) wire in order to place them proper distances from each other.

According to the purchasing site each meter of LEDs takes up 0.3W. I need 10m of LEDs (at 60LEDs/m) or 3W of power for the LEDs.

I believe this power supply at 12V, 1Amp for the LEDs and the Arduino as well will do what i need with 32W.

Id prefer not to blow up so if someone with a little more experience could let me know if this is correct and let me know if im missing something that would prevent this from being safe/not functional!

Thanks a lot!

I never saw this type of LED before. I don't understand what the advantages are compared to ws2812b. It appears to me that these leds will be much less efficient and have a much higher heat dissipation compared to ws2812b.

I would suggest using ws2182b leds or apa106 leds. These are available on small, separate pcb, or 5mm thru-hole format, so you won't have to cut a strip into many pieces.

Ws2812b and apa106 need a 5V power supply. When calculating the requirements of the power supply, you can assume a maximum current of 60mA per led, and calculate the total current required from the PSU from that.

I believe this power supply at 12V, 1Amp for the LEDs and the Arduino as well will do what i need with 32W.

No.
You can not take simply the power requirement in watts, you need to have the correct voltage, then calculate the current you need for that amount of power at that voltage.