200 Resistor instead of 220?

I am trying to do the Blink project and I don’t have a 220 Resistor. Can I use a 200 instead of 220? What will happen?

Yes, you can.

In answer to the second part :
10% more current may flow but if the resistor is connected to a non-linear device such as an LED the actual increase in flow may be a little less or a little more than 10% more. Assuming it is an LED and you are driving at 5 volts, the nominal voltage across the resistor may be about 3.6v so with 200ohms the current flow may be around 18mA which should be OK for most applications.

I am trying to do the Blink project and I don't have a 220 Resistor. Can I use a 200 instead of 220? What will happen?

Somehow I think it is time you met Georg

Most resistors can be altered a bit with a file. Some are just a carbon rod, some have the resistive material on the surface of a cylinder. If you file a little bit across the resistor, you have decreased the amount of conductive material. I've done this to make a custom set of resistors for a very specialized resistance ladder. Warning -- they're easy to break.

If you are blinking a LED, you can use anything from 150 to 1000 ohms, and it will be bright enough to see.

If you are going to be doing this electronics stuff, you will definitely learn about Ohm's law (as linked by raschemmel above) sooner, rather than later. It's a little bit mathy, but just basic arithmetic. There's lots of resources on the web.

If you are going to be doing this electronics stuff, you will definitely learn about Ohm's law (as linked by raschemmel above) sooner, rather than later. It's a little bit mathy, but just basic arithmetic. There's lots of resources on the web.

I have repeatedly asked the forum to change the software to require the OP to pass an Ohm's Law test to post in the General Electronics but for some reason they just ignore my requests....

Ohm's Law is not "a bit mathy". It involves knowing about multiplication and division. It is trivial to use.

Write it out as shown below.

E
IR

Cover up the letter you are looking to compute, and the formula jumps out at you. Want voltage (E)? It is I*R. Want current? It is E divided by R. Want resistance? Voltage divided by current. Nothing to it.
joe

For the super lazy, there is this:

The Calculator

There's lots of resources on the web.

That would be an understatement....

About 1,060,000 results (0.66 seconds)

Ohm's Law