24V solenoid connection

Greetings.
i would like to control a 24V DC solenoid with two switches connected in parallel so any switch can control the solenoid. My main concer is how to connect the diode..Should it be between the solenoid pins, or one diode between each switch...Any circuit sketch will be very appreciated.!

Across the solenoid coil.
The 2 switches will either connect 24V to the coil (high side switch, sourcing current), or connect the coil to Ground (low side switch sinking current).
Low side is usually used when driving the coil with a transistor, with a microcontroller driving the transistor.

So any switch can control the solenoid.

You need to be more specific, there are (at least) 3 different ways this could work:

Either switch when operated turns the solenoid on, but then the other switch does nothing.
Both switches have to be operated for the solenoid to be on.
Either switch when operated changes the state of the solenoid.

Which one do you want?

Thank you cross roads for the answer.
Yes PerryBebbington i forgot to mension that. So the idea is for the solenoid to be controlled with switch 1, or switch 2, or both at the time. Since it is for a diy pinball machine i was thinking of using such configuration for the slingshot circuit.
A solenoid and two parallel switches.

Then the circuit Crossroads has given you is what you want.

Something not often discussed is that putting a diode across a relay / solenoid coil slugs it, by which I mean it makes it slow to release. The diode allows the current to continue to flow, so the magnetic field collapses more slowly and the relay releases slowly. Whether this matters in your case you can judge, but be aware of it.

I understand what you mean. Will try to do this first...but lets just say that it would turn out to be too slow for my application..what would You suggest to speed up the process of "restarting" the coil?

I work in telecoms. When I started in 1977 the logic controlling telephone exchanges was all relays. Slugged relays were almost an art form. There were no diodes across relay coil to counteract the high voltages produced when contacts opened and it wasn't a problem. Obviously 300V is a problem for most electronics but with the right mechanical switches it should be okay.

xcg584:
I understand what you mean. Will try to do this first...but lets just say that it would turn out to be too slow for my application..what would You suggest to speed up the process of "restarting" the coil?

Is your solenoid working by pulling or pushing? Quicker action means you need more current or a stronger return spring, or both. What are the specific parameters of your solenoid? Without that information, you and all others are just guessing.
Paul

These are some cheap chinese solenoids so no true information is given about most of them...non the less will add the links of the three i have so far.

  1. VS1 DC12V 24V 110V AC 220V 3A 3Kg Open Frame Push Pull Solenoid Electromagnet Actuator| | - AliExpress

  2. VS1 AC/DC 12V 24V 110V 220V 35mm Long Stroke Push Pull Solenoid Small Electromagnetic Electric Magnet|Door Bolts| - AliExpress

  3. TAU 1564T travel 10mm DC12V/24V magnet open metal frame linear Solenoid Electromagnet Force 60N Pull&Push Type|magnet magnet|15mm magnetmagnet 15mm - AliExpress

the first two would be for pushing and the 3rd one for pulling

I like the SET/RESET (ON/OFF) FLIP FLOP approach:

I used latching relays for 277VAC contactor boxes I made for work. The green 30mm momentary connects the 120vac for the contactor coil. The contactor has an AUX relay that engages when the contactor is powered. The 120vac for the coil goes to the AUX relay so when it engages, it connects the ac to the contactor coil so as you
are releasing the green button , the contactor coil already has a secondary power source from the aux relay.
The STOP 30mm momentary is in series between the aux contacts output and the contactor coil so if you press
it , the contactor loses it's aux ac source. If you don't have a contactor with an aux relay you can just use a din
rail mount 120vac powered relay wired as the AUX relay so both the contactor coil and the secondary relay
are connected from the START BUTTON. They don't de-energize when you remove you finger from the green
button because when the din rail mount relay was energized , it provided ac to both the contactor and the secondary relay , which is functionally an AUX relay , but we don't call it that because we reserve that name for
the special relay made by the contactor mfg that mates with the contactor tab that moves when it engages.
You could call it a 'quasi-aux relay' and everyone would know you meant an ordinary relay performing the AUX
function.

PerryBebbington:
Slugged relays were almost an art form. There were no diodes across relay coil to counteract the high voltages produced when contacts opened and it wasn’t a problem.

Not so sure about that!

A slugged relay does not of course, produce such a “kickback” voltage. Parallel resistors were used to suppress it otherwise and resistor/ capacitor combinations across impulse contacts such as the telephone dial and repeater relays. And there were Copper oxide diodes in early systems for various functions.

The later model relay arrays had ceramic-encapsulated diodes (and 2 W resistors in maroon enamel) all over them! My favourite place was a disposals yard which scrapped stuff from the PMG Workshops nearby (I also bought a few lots on tender direct from the workshops) and I had (or still have) a good stock of the diodes, dirt cheap for the age. :grinning:

With a parallel resistor, the “kickback” voltage is defined by the ratio of parallel resistance to coil resistance times the operating voltage, so you get to choose the exact voltage you can tolerate.

Thank you for the helpl!!

Don't expect any two of your Chinese solenoids to act the same, in respect to timing.

Paul

Timing isn't really as issue for my needs. so that's not a problem.

If you want fast de-activation add a zener diode in series with the free-wheel diode, but back-to-back.
Pick around 24V for the zener voltage for deactivation speed to roughly match activation speed. Choose
a high power rating for the zener, 1.3W or higher. The actual power rating depends on how often the
solenoid is switched.

Noted, thank you all for the help!