3.7V 400 mAh Ion Battery for ESP8266?

I am fairly new to Arduino, and have been researching but haven't really gotten anywhere.

I am creating a fall detection system which will send an SMS to a person if a fall is detected. For this I was planning to use the Adafruit Feather 32u4, MPU 6050 and a Wi-Fi Module (ESP 8266).

Will a 3.7V 400 mAh Lithium Ion battery work with this project? I've researched and apparently the Wi-Fi Module will only except up to 3.3V, so would I have to buy something else to bring it down to 3.3V?

Help will be appreciated, thank you.

Onboard BT and a second module for WiFi seems overkill.
If you need both, then an ESP32 based board might be better.
Or find a board with just WiFi and a LiPo connection.
A WeMos D1 mini with LiPo shield might do.
Leo..

auforgold:
I am creating a fall detection system which will send an SMS to a person if a fall is detected. For this I was planning to use the Adafruit Feather 32u4, MPU 6050 and a Wi-Fi Module (ESP 8266).

Too many processors! The ESP8266 is way more capable than the Adafruit Feather, just forget the Feather!

auforgold:
Will a 3.7V 400 mAh Lithium Ion battery work with this project? I've researched and apparently the Wi-Fi Module will only accept up to 3.3V, so would I have to buy something else to bring it down to 3.3V?

Yes, you are correct - the ESP8277 is not specified about about 3.5 V and freshly charged or on charge, the Li-ion will be about 4.2 V.

You have a problem. If you use a silicon diode in series to drop 0.6 V, then you lose that voltage also as the battery discharges. If you use a LDO (Low Drop Out) regulator that can minimise that drop, it will probably not be able to pass the impulse current as the ESP8266 transmits - though a large capacitor (1 mF or more) on the ESP may permit this.

You should not have a problem. There are ESP32 boards out there that have on-board LiPo charging. I assume they handle the battery in a manner appropriate to the ESP without you having to mess about with extra regulators. My Heltec ESP32 has onboard display and bluetooth, as well as a socket for LiPo. There is probably something similar around that suits your needs.

Out of curiousity I looked a bit into this, and found the Adafruit huzzah32, an ESP32 based board which offers a.o. LiPo battery power.

The LiPo and 5V go through the same regulator - the ap2112-3.3 which has a dropout of just 125 mV at 300 mA (the ESP32 draws 200 mA normally), meaning that even when the battery is almost empty (voltage down to 3.2-3.3V) the supply voltage to the ESP will still be over 3.0V. That should work indeed.

wvmarle:
Adafruit huzzah32, an ESP32 based board which offers a.o. LiPo battery power.

It states that the board should be used for those who have somewhat of an experience in Arduino. I barely have any experience to be honest so I don't think it will be the best idea ha. It seems like I have to do more research on LiPo Batteries and understand on what all those symbols mean.

I guess I am to ditch the Feather as the ESP is more than capable.

Paul__B:
Yes, you are correct - the ESP8277 is not specified about about 3.5 V and freshly charged or on charge, the Li-ion will be about 4.2 V.

Did you mean the ESP8266..?

I'll do more research on Bluetooth Modules. It turns out I have a LiPo Battery but it's 3.7V 600 mAh, even worse... it really doesn't help that I live in Australia and many don't ship these batteries here.

auforgold:
It states that the board should be used for those who have somewhat of an experience in Arduino.

It sounds like a ploy, possibly to sell old stock. I don't have much experience with my ESP32 and NodeMCU but it's not that hard. ESPxxxx can use the Arduino IDE more or less verbatim, and I'm sure there will be an increasing flow of users in the Arduino world who never actually use an Arduino - just ESP.

seems like I have to do more research on LiPo Batteries and understand on what all those symbols mean.

It turns out I have a LiPo Battery but it's 3.7V 600 mAh,

The above statements are somewhat conflicting, and your main research might be on the plug at the end of the cable.

There is an outfit in South Brisbane that sells 3.7v LiPo on eBay, delivery through Aus Post.

auforgold:
It states that the board should be used for those who have somewhat of an experience in Arduino.

No need. They got their quirks, but so do the AVR processors.

I started off on the ESP8266 a few years ago, it was only when I ran into its limitations (pin count mostly) that I moved on to the Arduino Pro Mini boards for certain projects, especially where WiFi was not needed.

Nick_Pyner:
The above statements are somewhat conflicting, and your main research might be on the plug at the end of the cable.

My bad. My teacher purchased a 3.7V 600mAh battery for us to use for an Arduino project we did earlier this year (which involved the 32u4 Feather, which is why I mentioned it in the first post in this thread). None of us had any experience in Arduino coding, which is why I'm doing this to expand my knowledge.

I researched more about the Huzzah32, and damn it's expensive when shipping is added (even those who ship from Australia). I found this board, and it seems to be more cheaper when shipping is added.

I wasn't able to find a difference between that and the Huzzah32, unless there isn't much of a difference at all.

"we added a connector for any of our 3.7V Lithium polymer batteries and built in battery charging."

Does that mean the board I mentioned can be powered by 3.7V 600mAh LiPo battery..?

and damn it's expensive

The HelTec ESP32, with LiPo charging OLED display WiFi and Bluetooth is $AU16. If you are paying any more than that, you simply aren't trying hard enough. My NodeMCU cost about half that. It does not have a charging socket but people use it on 3.7v LiPo. There is a great swag of this sort of thing around, and it's all on eBay. I really can't comment on the Huzzah but, if they say it has a connector and charging for 3.7v LiPo, I guess it has, and that is what you want to use. They probably all have an option to use other power sources.

As long as the regulator has a low enough minimum dropout, you can happily power them with a 3.7v lipo. Connect the battery to the raw/Vin pin, not the 3.3v pin.

auforgold:
I researched more about the Huzzah32, and damn it's expensive when shipping is added (even those who ship from Australia). I found this board, and it seems to be more cheaper when shipping is added.

Which - postage - is why in Australia, unless desperate, we simply do not buy stuff from America.

Paul__B:
Which - postage - is why in Australia, unless desperate, we simply do not buy stuff from America.

Yes, of course :slight_smile:

Well, thank you to everyone that commented on this thread, appreciated!