4 button keypad no +5V connection

I've just brought a couple of these for a project i'm working on but i can't seem to find any info on them, has anyone used them before and can guide in in how to connect them and read the button presses. I've built a couple of simple tutorial circuits using single buttons on a breadboard and a resistor, but i'm not sure if these are treated the same. I'm starting to think not as there in no +5V pin only GRD and the K1-4 for the buttons?

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5Pin-1x4-4-Keys-Button-Keypad-Keyboard-Breadboard-Module-for-Arduino-DIY-Kit/283516616457?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

(deleted)

Connect the ground pin of the buttons to the ground pin of the Arduino, connect K1-4 to four digital input pins of the Arduino.
In your code, enable the internal pull-up resistors using pinMode(pin, INPUT_PULLUP).
When reading the buttons using digitalRead, a value of HIGH means that the button is released, and LOW means that it's pressed.

This is the standard way to read buttons. Most button examples that claim to be beginner-friendly make it more complicated than it should be by using external resistors and inverting the logic.

Pieter

Most button examples that claim to be beginner-friendly make it more complicated than it should be by using external resistors and inverting the logic.

I think that stems from the feeling that HIGH (5V) must mean ON which would fit with most people's experience with electrical wiring

I've seen some similar modules but using LEDs, and looking at the pin assignment, it seems designed to allow you to plug directly into the Arduino edge connector. In this case the mapping directly supports:

GND - GND
K4 - D13
K3 - D12
K2 - D11
K1 - D10

UKHeliBob:
I think that stems from the feeling that HIGH (5V) must mean ON which would fit with most people's experience with electrical wiring

The problem is that the learning process often happens at an overly accelerated pace, such that people have already created a partially working 5000 lines autonomous fire breathing chicken coop door closing robot, before being introduced to a sensible way of reading a switch.

UKHeliBob:
I think that stems from the feeling that HIGH (5V) must mean ON which would fit with most people's experience with electrical wiring

Indeed, but it does more harm than good in my opinion.
Explaining that LOW means pressed is not that hard, and shouldn't be dumbed down.

I always think of it as: you press down on the button to activate it, so the button is lower when you press it, hence the result of digitalRead will be LOW.
If you think about it like that, if (buttonState == LOW) makes perfect sense.

aarg:
The problem is that the learning process often happens at an overly accelerated pace, such that people have already created a partially working 5000 lines autonomous fire breathing chicken coop door closing robot, before being introduced to a sensible way of reading a switch.

Exactly.