5-Phase Stepper Motor help

So i found this Berger Lahr RDM 564/50 5-Phase stepper motor .

Going by the datasheet , it is a bipolar 5-phase ( to my understanding 5 seperate windings ? ) , maximum torque is 1100Ncm , and going by the data on the actual motor , Iw is 0.75A and Rw is 2.5 ohms .

I have only worked on small bipolar ones ( 1 or 2 windings ) and i remember how those need to be set up .

I have no idea how to wire up this 5-Phase one , and i would like to use it .

I saw some options of combining 5 H-Bridges , (1H bridge for each winding) , but i cant find how to control those bridges at the same time with an Arduino .

Here is the link for the motor datasheet : http://www.zappautomation.co.uk/productattachments/index/download?id=105

ArduiCro: I have no idea how to wire up this 5-Phase one , and i would like to use it .

I suspect your most productive course of action is to ask the manufacturer.

A 2-phase stepper motor requires 2 h-bridges to work so, presumably, a 5 phase motor will require 5 h-brdiges.

I would not be surprised to find the manufacturer makes a specialist driver for the motor which would make it easy to control with an Arduino.

I also suspect the economical course of action would be to buy a 2-phase motor :)

...R

A 5-phase motor requires at least 5 half-bridges, or of course, a 5 phase motor driver (these are specialized, and there aren't any that I know of for the hobby market). What you can use depends on how many wires are coming out of the motor. Ten wires allows all types of drivers, but some of them have only 5.

Lots of information on these motors and others at http://homepage.divms.uiowa.edu/~jones/step/

One way is to drive as a 5-phase AC motor, then only need a 5-phase bridge (5 half-bridges) and 5-phase sinusoidal PWM drive. This should give the smoothest running (which is why 5-phase motors exist). However this isn't using chopper drive so the supply voltage can't be very high and the top speed will thus be low.

With a 10-wire motor 5 current-controlling chopper circuits could be used and thus get high performance.

There are schemes for driving 5 wire motors with choppers I think, but it gets tricky as the windings interact.

Managed to isolate the two pieces of info that i think will help alot .

Winding 1 is A(Yellow) + B(White)
Winding 2 is C(Blue) + D(Red)
Winding 3 is E(Orange) + F(Green)
Winding 4 is G(Grey) + H(Black)
Winding 5 is J(Brown) + K(Violet)

The rest is in the attachments , where there is some kind of a graph which shows all windings and the way they are supposed to be powered i guess .

It also shows a 5H bridge diagram which is what powers it , but nothing is that simple … or is it ?

Or use those chopper circuits , which is the first time i hear of those

The very dumb way to drive it would be unipolar: Connect one wire from each winding to a low voltage supply (2V?), the other to a MOSFET or darlington to ground, then sequence them one at a time.

The low winding impedance makes this tricky, and the 0.75A current rather too large for a ULN2003 or ULN2803. Perhaps parallel two ULN2803's for higher current, use 4V supply (darlingtons lose a couple of volts).

IMG_20170208_101635.png

Yet another naive H-bridge circuit with shoot-through. I don't recommend using that circuit without modification.

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Note that the resistors slow down the response so high speed PWM isn't going to do well, but the devices will turn off before the opposite one turns on...

And the decoupling on the motor supply - not great to omit this, keeps the EMI down in the power wiring. Note this is a half-H-bridge only.

There are better circuits for H-bridges...

Well , at the moment i have no idea what to use ...

Is it possible to drive it as a 2-phase ? Or will that overload the 2 windings and damage the motor ?

On a side note , i have found a Vexta UDX5107N ( or whatever the brand is ) , which is supposedly a 5-Phase driver , but only has 5 wires coming out for the motor , and no way of connecting to an Arduino ?

This eBay ad for the Vexta UDX5107N driver clearly shows connections that should be suitable for an Arduino.

The CW (+/-) and CCW (+/-) terminals are likely optoisolated STEP (or possibly DIR) inputs. Find the manual to be sure.

Found the manual , CW (+/-) is for input signals for CW rotation from a controller , and CCW(+/-) is for CCW rotation , and can be hooked up directly to a controller .

The out. current OFF can also be connected to a controller directly .

The H.OFF ( temperature safety i guess ) needs an opto-coupler to be connected to a controller and the one output i dont understand is Excitation timing output .

And if someone can explain why is the motor connected to the controller by only 5 wires when it has 10 ? My guess is that the ends of the windings are all connected to GND ?

This seems like a good solution , at least usability wise ... 45$ doesnt seem too steep with all the functions it has

My guess is that the ends of the windings are all connected to GND ?

Most certainly not.

There are several possible internal connections. See the reference in reply #2.

ArduiCro: And if someone can explain why is the motor connected to the controller by only 5 wires when it has 10 ? My guess is that the ends of the windings are all connected to GND ?

5 wires is 5-phase delta or Y, 10 wires is the windings separately (so you can choose delta or Y). 6 wires would mean 5-phase Y with common brought out (or perhaps just case ground)

So if i got it right 5 wires to the driver .then end of W1 is connected to the beggining of W2 and so on , and if done correctly the mid points of those connections should connect to the 5 wires ?

then end of W1 is connected to the beggining of W2

Maybe not. You haven't looked at that link yet, have you?

I did , if you are referring to the picture in the attachemnt .

bandicam 2017-02-10 15-11-46-242.jpg