5v regulator

I am using a 5v regulator like the one I have linked to here.

I was wondering if it is possible to overload the regulator. I have been doing some test at 12v but I will soon be connecting a 400watt power supply and i wanted to be sure the regulator will be able to handle that.

Thanks in advance.

I think you are not really aware of what you have and what you might require. That regulator you have has a 1 amp maximum output current rating. If more then 1 amp is attempted to be drawn from the regulator's output it will start to go into a protection mode and shutoff current.

You stated you have a 400 watt supply? Is that a 12vdc supply? If it is that is over 30 amps of current and not something that you will be able to regulate with a 7805 voltage regulator.

Lefty

you are correct I am not quire sure what I am doing. Can you explain the requirements to me. I am trying power some components with a 400 watt power supply from a desktop computer. My arduino will have its own wall wart.

Well give us a list of items you want to power, ans what voltages and current each item requires.

Your 400 watt PC power supply outputs several different voltages at different current capacities. Saying it's a 400 watt supply doesn't give us enough specific information on the current it can supply at each of it's avalible output voltages. Also the PC power supply usually have a +5vdc output amoung it's output voltages, so it's not clear to me why you needed a 7805 regulator also?

Lefty

OK I am powering 80 hi-tec HS-311 servo motors and 300 LED lights.

I am using this power supply.

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=400+watt+power+supply&cid=8377458238949846527&sa=title#p

is this not the best way to go about doing something like this? Can you make another recommendation.

I am trying to use the power supply to power a bread board with all these components.

aye, i just replaced a 400 watt power supply in my parents computer, the original 400 watt was giving insane amounts of amps on the 3V line and a joke on the 12 volt line, the new is just the opposite

also a 7805 driving an amp? yea i guess if you bolt a brick of metal on it, i could not even drive my BBarduino off of one with no heatsink without it getting quite warm

and by brick i mean not the best to220 heatsink they sell at radio shack, i mean a BRICK for continuous performance at its max 1 amp rating

I am trying to use the power supply to power a bread board with all these components.

Using a bread board to connect 300 LEDs and 80 servo motors is not going to work. It won't take the current. That is a lot of current and a lot of wires you have to solder it all up on at least strip board.

The power supply will give you 20A at 5V so I am not sure why you need a puny 1A 5V regulator.

so I am not sure why you need a puny 1A 5V regulator.

Maybe he's a real man using a real man's regulator :P

Yeah that's a lot of LEDs to wire up. What is the project? Sounds interesting (if a bit big and horrendously time consuming!)

Mowcius

I was planning to use the regulator in front of each component so that I can be sure that I will not damage any of the motors or the LEDs but it sounds like this is not a good idea. What should I use?

also is there anyway to prototype high current circuits without soldering?

Do any of you have any thoughts on this power supply issue?

I was planning to use the regulator in front of each component

There is no point you get no component protection by doing this. Feeding a component with 5V from a supply or 5V regulated down is the same thing. Anyway you are not going to put a regulator infromt of each LED are you?

there anyway to prototype high current circuits without soldering?

No, why are you afraid of solder. Solder is your friend. Anyway it is only high current because you are having a vast number of components in parallel. Sure use solder less bread board for one or two if you must but not all 300 LEDs and 80 servos!

Do any of you have any thoughts on this power supply issue?

Use the power supply you have, it gives you a 5V output at 20A if you run each LED at 15mA then that only takes 4.5A. What voltage is your servo? If it is 5V then you have 15.5A left. This gives you almost 200mA per servo.

Thank you so much for all your help. I am a designer who has no formal knowledge of electronics. This is the largest project I have ever worked on. With that in mind I am going to ask some very stupid questions and I would appreciate you understanding.

When I connect these elements in parallel using my wall wart as a power supply I have been noticing a reduction in voltage, and I have been unable to run all the motors. and yes it is a 5v motor. I assumed I would need much more than a 5v power supply to power all these motors. I thought this results in me using a 5v regulator since my power supply would have to be much larger than 5v. is this not correct?

Can too many amps damage any of these components? You said I will have 15.5A left over can these excess amps overload the components? If so how do I protect against that.

and no I am not afraid of solder I will plan to solder the circuit.

Again please excuse my noob questions. I will look forward to your reply. Thanks again for all your help. this has been a real education.

1) most 5 volt regulators will run on as little as 7 volts, and your probably overloading your wallwart (which is bad, so be careful)

2) no, more amps than you need is ok, the circuit will take what it needs

:)

using my wall wart as a power supply I have been noticing a reduction in voltage

As he said this is because you are trying to take more current than the wall wart is capable of supplying. To get more power you don't change the voltage you have to change your wall wart for one that gives more current. Current is what flows and voltage is what pushes it. Power is the product (as in maths product) of current and voltage.

If a component is designed to be connected across a voltage it will take what it needs. However some components will take more than they need and you have to do something to limit the current. One such type of component is an LED, that's why you have a resistor to stop them taking too much current.

Have a read of:- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohm%27s_law http://www.thebox.myzen.co.uk/Tutorial/LEDs.html http://www.thebox.myzen.co.uk/Tutorial/Power_Supplies.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_supplies

This is a big project for any one with experience, try and get some face to face advice if you can. Look out for local groups, radio hams are also usually friendly and widespread.

OK wow thanks I think I finally understand.

One final question. Part of this project uses this conductive tape.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000UZ8SJK

when I use the new power supply will this work ok? or is it like the breadboard?

Yeh its fine . You could run lightening down that. Where will you stand when you fire it all up ?

I'd like to see that !

Yeh its fine . You could run lightening down that.

Yeah you could but it would vapourise pretty quickly. It is less than a mil thick

Mowcius

I am sorry I don't understand that last reply.

will it burn up? How long will it last?

I connected to servos today to a 12v 1a wall wart. through a 5v regulator. The same one I told you about earlier. each servo uses 150mA each I should have more than enough current.

I connected a multi-meter to the 5v output from the regulator. The voltage was fluctuating when the motors changed position. I should have more than enough current.

Why is this happening?

Thanks for any help sorry to be such a pest.

I am sorry I don't understand that last reply.

He said that if you try and run lightning down copper foil it will vaporise.

Bit of a joke. ;)

I connected a multi-meter to the 5v output from the regulator. The voltage was fluctuating when the motors changed position. I should have more than enough current.

How were you measuring it. If it with an electronic multimeter maybe the noise was interfering with the instrument. Also add some large capacitors across the motor say 47uF to 220uF.

I am sorry I don't understand that last reply.

will it burn up? How long will it last?

Oh sorry, yeah bit of a joke. It will be fine for your project.

Mowcius

Is it absolutely necessary to put capacitors in front of and behind a voltage regulator?

The cut sheet seems to call for it but it is working fine without them.

Any input?