60W Iron

I just got a 60W iron and I read that I can't use more than 40W for PC boards. I wanted to do some Elenco projects, and I can't afford another iron. Plus it has a C° dial for temp, and I don't know what I should set it at. :slightly_frowning_face:

350° C for 60/40 But, show us your iron and the tips you have.

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adele: I read that I can't use more than 40W for PC boards.

Who said that. That might be true for a dumb poker, but it seems you have a temp controlled iron. Yes, ~350C is ok. Hotter burns off the flux too quickly, colder takes too long to finish. Leo..

Wawa:
Who said that.

I read this information on the package.

This is the iron that I have currently: Iron

Since you can reduce the temperature to 350C you will be fine. Look at the many soldering tutorials on YouTube.

Do not heat a component for more than a few seconds.

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Thanks. I will try this iron. I haven’t had much luck with soldering.

There are a lot of tutorials out there - basic rules are use enough flux (multicore solder for soldering, extra rosin for rework), and have a hot enough iron that you can work quickly - too cold an iron can lead to burning things out (strange though that may seem). And clean the tip frequently...

15 Watts with a tiny tip

that is ideal for soldering electronic devices ...

40 years of experience ...

Just give the iron 2 minutes to heat up.

Sometimes 40watt (current rework station) is not enough, especially when your experienced (fast). I do have a 15watt pencil iron for mobile phone sized smd work. Leo..

adele: I just got a 60W iron and I read that I can't use more than 40W for PC boards. I wanted to do some Elenco projects, and I can't afford another iron. Plus it has a C° dial for temp, and I don't know what I should set it at. :slightly_frowning_face:

Hi,

I addition, i have found that many of the soldering irons sold today are advertised as being 60 watts when really they are just barely 40 watts. Now i am not saying that yours is definitely 40 watts, but i am saying it deserves a test. You'd have to measure the input power or measure the input current and approximate the input power.

I contacted one seller about why this was and the reply was, "i dont know" :-)

On the plus side, i have been able to solder almost everything with the 40 watt iron except for the real heavy stuff like 8 gauge wire but you really need a soldering gun for that anyway. I bought a Harbor Freight soldering gun and the tip burnt out after just about 3 uses. I replaced the tip since then though with a better quality tip.

With the 40 watt iron i soldered 22 gauge wire, DIP package ic's, SMD package ic's, resistors, small capacitors, LED's, diodes (regular package type), all that stuff. So it works, it just wasnt advertised as 40 watts it was advertised as 60 watts.

I had the same problem with a glue gun i bought that was supposed to be 80 watts and it was actually half that.

Good luck to you, and i know you will learn to solder, just practice and read stuff on the web about soldering various things like regular parts and SMD parts if you want to do SMD stuff too. It's almost like welding where once you get the knack of it you can do it without even thinking about it too much after that.