7805 with 6 volt (batteris) in container?

Hi, I want to move from arduino to standalone chip. Components to use are bluetooth radio, gyro and atmel 328, as well as 7805 and capacitors. Will power using 4 AA batteries.

Will heat be a problem if I use a PLA printed enclosure?

franmx:
Hi, I want to move from Arduino to standalone chip.

I very much doubt that! It makes no sense.

franmx:
Components to use are Bluetooth radio, gyro and Atmel 328, as well as 7805 and capacitors. Will power using 4 AA batteries.

A 7805 is a (rather old and inefficient) linear voltage regulator chip which requires a supply of no less than 7 V. Four AA batteries provide only 6 V or a little more (6.4 V) when new. So I cannot see what you would be using a 7805 for apart from some bizarre form of decoration.

franmx:
Will heat be a problem if I use a PLA printed enclosure?

I don't know. It depends on what you put in there!

(I hope you do not think I am kidding you! :astonished: I am not.)

Thanks and for sure I don't think you're kidding, in fact that's the reason I posted!

I really want to move to "standalone" atmel chip, where I live it's not that cost effective to have several small projects around with full arduinos.

I was wondering about 7805 because that is referenced around the web, included Arduino (Arduino - Setting up an Arduino on a breadboard).
What alternatives would you recommend?

Idea is to put hc05 bluetooth radio, 6090 gyro and atmel chip + (crystal, 22.pf capacitors).

The HC05 needs 3.3V supply so it will need a 3.3V regulator. I can't find a 6090 gyro, maybe you mean MPU6050?

With a 6V battery pack I have used diodes to drop the 6V to a level that the mega328 will tolerate. A rectifier diode like the 1N400x series will drop approximately 0.6V so 1 or 2 in series with the positive side of the battery pack will provide a safe voltage for the board. No regulator needed for the 5V.

Do you need 16MHz? Running the 328 at 8MHz (internal) will let you use a 3.3V regulator for all of the parts. And you don't need the crystal and caps.

Sounds to me the best is a buck step down converter. Dirt cheap and work very well.

franmx:
I really want to move to "standalone" Atmel chip, where I live it's not that cost effective to have several small projects around with full Arduinos.

An "Arduino" Pro Mini - i.e, clone - costs about 2 or 3 $US. Trying to put together an ATMega328 plus crystal plus capacitors (you need many more than just the 22 pF ones) and a PCB to match that is not sensible.

franmx:
I was wondering about 7805 because that is referenced around the web, included Arduino (Arduino - Setting up an Arduino on a breadboard). What alternatives would you recommend?

You need to first answer what it is you need a voltage regulator for? Only then can we answer.

franmx:
Idea is to put hc05 Bluetooth radio, 6090 gyro and Atmel chip + (crystal, 22.pf capacitors).

And what else? What is it you want to do?

Sounds like you want to replicate a Wii handpiece.

groundFungus:
The HC05 needs 3.3V supply so it will need a 3.3V regulator.

Very few people use the bare HC-05 module.
Most HC-05 modules are mounted on a sub board (with 6 pins), with a 3.3volt regulator and other supporting parts.
That one needs 3.6-5.5volt according what's written on the back of the module.
Leo..

Thanks all!

I had a look and local shop does carry "arduino" pro mini clone. Seems like a nice alternative price-wise. Project that got me on looking for stand alone is a "yaw" reader to make a game-ish controller, not exactly wiimote. I have arduino uno working as needed, but again wanted to move somewhere more permanent.

I'm not using a bare hc-05, it's like Wawa mentions a board, it does states 3.6V - 6V

Most likely, will go the pro mini route.

I use three AA or AAA batteries to power things so that no regulators are needed.