80 mhz arduino !

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/13229?utm_source=SparkFun+Customer+Newsletter&utm_campaign=6c5901f715-May15_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_fa5287abaf-6c5901f715-60636505


it is a cortex arm at 80mhz and arduino ide compatible

does anyone know anything about it ?

is it any good ?

The Arduino Due is 84 MHz, and the libraries have been adapted for the Due with many bugfixes. At the moment the Arduino Due is not available in the shop, but it is 36 euros. A clone on Ebay is 20 dollars.

Gadget999: https://www.sparkfun.com/products/13229?utm_source=SparkFun+Customer+Newsletter&utm_campaign=6c5901f715-May15_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_fa5287abaf-6c5901f715-60636505


it is a cortex arm at 80mhz and arduino ide compatible

does anyone know anything about it ?

is it any good ?

However, to get the most out of the device, you will need to use the PSoC Creator IDE (which is free of charge with no code limits from Cypress Semiconductor). Please keep in mind that the PSoC Creator software is Windows-only at this time.

Being very familiar with Cypress Creator, it is not a novice tool set. Additionally, Cypress preaches a C environment rather than a C++ one, so you must change defaults to compile C++. These tools are for professional developers or very serious experimenter.

IMO, you would have a far better play with the $4 Maple Mini or $10 Maple: 72MHz, 20K SRAM, 128K flash stm32duino.com Many generic boards also supported.

Ray

I agree with MrBurnette, the stm32diuno's are slowly become well supported are are awesome for the money !!

As a sidenote : I have had many AVR running at 32MHz (tiny13, tiny85, '328, '1284) using a clock oscillator (very cheap !) I also have a 40MHz clock waiting to be tested, should work fine, there was no noticable temperature change at 32MHz and no unusual glitches over several months

I have had many AVR running at 32mHz

Using a clock supplied by a metronome?

so. "MHz"

“768 in stock”

They must have confidence in this thing. I am not sure I do. Though I do like the PSOC concept, especially the CPLD-like programmable digital, 4(!) true DACs, and the 20-bit ADC on this thing. I wonder if the Arduino libraries take the ADC differences into account. Very neat ICs, but I really wonder if they will set the hobby community on fire.

I quite like the look of these...

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/digistump/oak-by-digistump-wi-fi-for-all-things-arduino-comp?ref=nav_search

AWOL: Using a clock supplied by a metronome?

That's quite slow, really.

[quote author=Nick Gammon link=msg=2235457 date=1431850451] That's quite slow, really. [/quote]

Me thinks AWOL was pulling our reset pin low!

Ray

The mini maple looks pretty awesome

Does it work with the arduino software and libaries ?

Is it 5v tolerant ?

How does it compare to a teensy 3 ?

I have just been on the maple website and the whole project has been shelved !

No more hardware or software developments !

Seems crazy to me, the product is now dead ???

I ask myself, what can you do with 80 MHz that you can't do with 16 MHz? Clearly whatever-it-is you are doing is done faster. But if that is feeding the cat/fish/chickens or opening a door when someone presents an RFID card, you are not really needing that extra power. The nice thing about the AVR line is their simplicity of use.

[quote author=Nick Gammon date=1431901807 link=msg=2236399] I ask myself, what can you do with 80 MHz that you can't do with 16 MHz? [/quote] VGA

Serious video.

[quote author=Nick Gammon date=1431901807 link=msg=2236399] Clearly whatever-it-is you are doing is done faster. But if that is feeding the cat/fish/chickens or opening a door when someone presents an RFID card, you are not really needing that extra power. The nice thing about the AVR line is their simplicity of use. [/quote] I think many people are really looking for more program memory (and RAM), and more I/O.

Gadget999: I have just been on the maple website and the whole project has been shelved !

No more hardware or software developments !

Seems crazy to me, the product is now dead ???

"I have just been on the maple Leaflabs website and the whole project has been shelved !"

But you missed the entire point of the post... Clones are available starting at $4 from the Chinese mainland. A number of Arduino cores are available from github to work with Arduino 1.6.x and above. This one is rather complete for the STM32F103 microcontroller: Arduino_STM32 and the associated forum is here: stm32duino

The Leaflabs forum and support is simply no longer required. Their pre-1.0 core required significant refresh to work with 1.5.x and higher. This effort is 99% complete for the F103 core. Work is continuing on F1, F4, and other cores and variants.

Nick Gammon: "I ask myself, what can you do with 80 MHz that you can't do with 16 MHz? Clearly whatever-it-is you are doing is done faster. But if that is feeding the cat/fish/chickens or opening a door when someone presents an RFID card, you are not really needing that extra power. The nice thing about the AVR line is their simplicity of use."

The Maple Mini clone looks like a Pro Micro, smells like a baby Leonardo but with 128K of flash and 20K of SRAM for $4 - $5 USD. It programs with Arduino 1.6.x over the virtual USB. It is native 3.3V but has a onboard regulator to allow it to run from 5V USB. There are a number of 5V tolerent Digital Pins to make interfacing easy.

So, it really has nothing to do with speed, but more the speed is simply inherit to the STM32 microcontroller architecture. One could easily change the PLL and run the microcontroller at 24 or 48 MHz to save power. Or one can overclock the uC. For $4+ you get a 32-bit uC with a throughput of 90MIPS. The STM32 F103 also has DMA and a working ILI9341 modified Adafruit library is available to make use of SPI DMA... FAST. Work is continuing on I2C DMA.

It was not but maybe 18 months ago that an atmega328P mini clone was $4 and now they are under $2. For the price of that same 8-bit uC running at 16MHz 18 months ago, you can now buy a 32-bit micro board running at 72MHz. Personally, I think this is simply too good of an option to ignore! But, I concede that if all you are doing is blinking a LED one-second On and one-second Off... you can do that with a 555.

I suspect there are a lots of Arduino loyalists who would like to play with a $40 Due but the entry price is a bit steep for the hobby. At 10% of the Due cost, one can play with a 32-bit Arduino-ish STM32 device. Why not? Arduino Land has changed; the original team split - sides have been taken, lines have been drawn, lawsuits have been filed, domain names have been secured... nothing is as it was. But the effort in the GUI is open source and will survive and evolve. The 3rd party core integration is documented and is open to anyone. I respect all that have given over the years but options are popping up likes weeds after a rain. For those who are just starting out, the basic 8-bit stuff is fine. For those looking for a thrill or to bypass the limited 8-bit resource ceilings, options are available - for cheap.

Ray

Arduino Land has changed; the original team split ...

I suppose but by moving to a different processor it is also splitting the resources. I can answer questions about the 328 timers but not the Due timers because it is a completely different processor. Ditto for I2C, SPI, etc.

Maybe that doesn't matter. But for me buying a chip that can do 80 MHz when 8 MHz will do the job is like buying a car that can do 200 km/h when the speed limit in the whole country is 100 km/h or less.

[quote author=Nick Gammon date=1431981519 link=msg=2237687] like buying a car that can do 200 km/h when the speed limit in the whole country is 100 km/h or less. [/quote] Sounding like my wife! Not that I disagree.

Have that clone board sitting here (maybe two), yet to get going with it.

[quote author=Nick Gammon link=msg=2237687 date=1431981519] I suppose but by moving to a different processor it is also splitting the resources. I can answer questions about the 328 timers but not the Due timers because it is a completely different processor. Ditto for I2C, SPI, etc.

Maybe that doesn't matter. But for me buying a chip that can do 80 MHz when 8 MHz will do the job is like buying a car that can do 200 km/h when the speed limit in the whole country is 100 km/h or less. [/quote]

Well, that is like saying that buying an expensive sports car is silly because a Yaris will get you from point A to point B. I had my share of sports cars when I was younger and love them, regardless of the cost. But these days, I have a hybrid because I am trying to act like the responsible old fart my daughter believes I should be...

It is not just the speed, it is the entire resource issue, too. Extra SRAM and multichannel peripherials, 12-bit A/D instead of 10-bit 328-ish stuff. And, Arduino is moving into Intel territory with Galileo; Ladyada tweeted this week that Arduino boards for the Arduino.cc team would be manufactured in New York City by Adafruit, etc. With Arduino.cc themselves breaking the 8-bit mould and moving into ARM with the Due, with the new alliances... well, I assume you remember the story of Humpty Dumpty?

I believe a beginner with Arduino should be in the 8-bit world unless they are a college student working on a project - where the project requirements will dictate the hardware. But the days of Arduino being 8-bit only has already left the building - like Elvis.

It is neither good or bad, it is just fact.

Ray

That may well be the case. However we already have more powerful processors. My kids (and I) play 3D games on them. The graphics cards do amazing things you could only drool about a few years ago.

Paul__B: VGA

Serious video. I think many people are really looking for more program memory (and RAM), and more I/O.

That's fine too, and I am not disagreeing with either of you, in a sense.

But again, if you want to do "serious video" fire up your Linux box with 1 Gb of RAM and use Blender.

I think there will always be a place for those cheap, simple, low-power 8-bit chips. The sorts that can consume 100 nA until you press a button on your calculator/doorbell/safe opener. And therefore there will be a place to learn how to use them.

Personally, I enjoy trying to squeeze all I can out of my processors. Using 8bit with minimal resources to do some crazy things teaches me a level of discipline I might not have learned from faster 32bit.. just my two-penneth :)

mcnobby: Personally, I enjoy trying to squeeze all I can out of my processors. Using 8bit with minimal resources to do some crazy things teaches me a level of discipline I might not have learned from faster 32bit.. just my two-penneth :)

We (engineer-programmers) are always at a crossroads - new toys are constantly introduced and older toys become less expensive. With silicon, we can blame Moore's Law. But, the trend of "faster, cheaper" goes back long before microelectronics.

I am old enough to remember when the mainframe programmers made similar "level of discipline" statements about the evolving minicomputer kids! It's a very true statement about 8-bit machines, but the same will one day be said about 32-bit machines. Circle of "digital" life.

Ray