80 mhz arduino !

Arduino Land has changed; the original team split ...

I suppose but by moving to a different processor it is also splitting the resources. I can answer questions about the 328 timers but not the Due timers because it is a completely different processor. Ditto for I2C, SPI, etc.

Maybe that doesn't matter. But for me buying a chip that can do 80 MHz when 8 MHz will do the job is like buying a car that can do 200 km/h when the speed limit in the whole country is 100 km/h or less.

[quote author=Nick Gammon date=1431981519 link=msg=2237687] like buying a car that can do 200 km/h when the speed limit in the whole country is 100 km/h or less. [/quote] Sounding like my wife! Not that I disagree.

Have that clone board sitting here (maybe two), yet to get going with it.

[quote author=Nick Gammon link=msg=2237687 date=1431981519] I suppose but by moving to a different processor it is also splitting the resources. I can answer questions about the 328 timers but not the Due timers because it is a completely different processor. Ditto for I2C, SPI, etc.

Maybe that doesn't matter. But for me buying a chip that can do 80 MHz when 8 MHz will do the job is like buying a car that can do 200 km/h when the speed limit in the whole country is 100 km/h or less. [/quote]

Well, that is like saying that buying an expensive sports car is silly because a Yaris will get you from point A to point B. I had my share of sports cars when I was younger and love them, regardless of the cost. But these days, I have a hybrid because I am trying to act like the responsible old fart my daughter believes I should be...

It is not just the speed, it is the entire resource issue, too. Extra SRAM and multichannel peripherials, 12-bit A/D instead of 10-bit 328-ish stuff. And, Arduino is moving into Intel territory with Galileo; Ladyada tweeted this week that Arduino boards for the Arduino.cc team would be manufactured in New York City by Adafruit, etc. With Arduino.cc themselves breaking the 8-bit mould and moving into ARM with the Due, with the new alliances... well, I assume you remember the story of Humpty Dumpty?

I believe a beginner with Arduino should be in the 8-bit world unless they are a college student working on a project - where the project requirements will dictate the hardware. But the days of Arduino being 8-bit only has already left the building - like Elvis.

It is neither good or bad, it is just fact.

Ray

That may well be the case. However we already have more powerful processors. My kids (and I) play 3D games on them. The graphics cards do amazing things you could only drool about a few years ago.

Paul__B: VGA

Serious video. I think many people are really looking for more program memory (and RAM), and more I/O.

That's fine too, and I am not disagreeing with either of you, in a sense.

But again, if you want to do "serious video" fire up your Linux box with 1 Gb of RAM and use Blender.

I think there will always be a place for those cheap, simple, low-power 8-bit chips. The sorts that can consume 100 nA until you press a button on your calculator/doorbell/safe opener. And therefore there will be a place to learn how to use them.

Personally, I enjoy trying to squeeze all I can out of my processors. Using 8bit with minimal resources to do some crazy things teaches me a level of discipline I might not have learned from faster 32bit.. just my two-penneth :)

mcnobby: Personally, I enjoy trying to squeeze all I can out of my processors. Using 8bit with minimal resources to do some crazy things teaches me a level of discipline I might not have learned from faster 32bit.. just my two-penneth :)

We (engineer-programmers) are always at a crossroads - new toys are constantly introduced and older toys become less expensive. With silicon, we can blame Moore's Law. But, the trend of "faster, cheaper" goes back long before microelectronics.

I am old enough to remember when the mainframe programmers made similar "level of discipline" statements about the evolving minicomputer kids! It's a very true statement about 8-bit machines, but the same will one day be said about 32-bit machines. Circle of "digital" life.

Ray

Paul__B: Sounding like my wife!

Dave Barry wrote something funny about that ages ago. He wrote something like:

I want to get a new PC, but my wife disagrees because --- get this! --- the old one works perfectly well.

I found the quote: http://www.ibiblio.org/jimmy/mcguinn/Barry.html

For example, as a guy, I feel I need a new computer every time a new model comes out, which is every 15 minutes. This baffles my wife, who has had the same computer since the Civil War and refuses to get a new one because -- get THIS for an excuse -- the one she has works fine.

mcnobby: I agree with MrBurnette, the stm32diuno's are slowly become well supported are are awesome for the money !!

As a sidenote : I have had many AVR running at 32MHz (tiny13, tiny85, '328, '1284) using a clock oscillator (very cheap !) I also have a 40MHz clock waiting to be tested, should work fine, there was no noticable temperature change at 32MHz and no unusual glitches over several months

It's not all about temperature. It can easily get unstable without overheating

I need to count 6000 pulses a second on 2 pins and possibly 2 more

I have been considering a teensy but this looks even better !

I am very faithful to arduino it has helped me get started into the world of microprocessors and the reason it bas been so sucessful is this forum ! A place we can go for knowledge, help and a sense of humour !

I recently bought a pcduino that is a neat product, it can run android and linux. I was hoping its fast processor could count more pulses - sadly the operating system sucks up all the extra power.

The biggest problem with the pcduino is the support ! It sucks so bad i have given up using it !

The arduino support is excellent. It is the main reason the product has been sucessful.

Anyway back to the maple mini :

Can it count 6k pulses on 2 pins ?
how do i find out which i/o pins are 5v tolerant ?

I am going to buy a couple and try them out

A place we can go for knowledge, help and a sense of humour !

Oh, aye, we have that here!

Can it count 6k pulses on 2 pins ?

My sketch on this page: http://www.gammon.com.au/timers counts up to 8 MHz so I don't think the Atmega328 will be too troubled by 6 kHz.

Gadget999:
<…>
The arduino support is excellent. It is the main reason the product has been sucessful.

Anyway back to the maple mini :

Can it count 6k pulses on 2 pins ?
how do i find out which i/o pins are 5v tolerant ?

I am going to buy a couple and try them out

2 things:

  1. The Arduino Forum is great: fantastic members with a broad spectrum of knowledge. While Arduino.cc as a company deserves great praise for paying for the costs with the understanding that a free forum for ideas and support is a key to their success. It is my understanding that Forum Moderators are unpaid and their job is very often thankless: Kudos to the company and the FM.

However, things are changing and with all the new boards being injected into the market, much of the old knowledge-base is not going to be 100% directly transferable to new products. What will transfer is the scientific method and rational reasoning; hopefully, this will sustain the forums which is the primary support vehicle.

  1. Other than to give you the link for “which i/o pins are 5v tolerant ?”, I would suggest coming over to stm32duino.com and lurking around. If you are Arduino knowledgeable, you will find the forum reasonably comfortable. It is not newbie friendly as this forum, but there are good people willing to help out in a non-critical way assuming you have done your homework with Google: Please consult the older Maple and Maple Mini documentation first as most newbie questions should be there.

Ray

Thanks for the help guys

I will get a maple mini and have a play with it

Nick - thanks for sharing the frequency counter code

I wanted to use interrupts to do the counting, do some calcs and then transmit the data via the serial port. Have you tried the max frequency you can count using interrupts ?

mrburnette: However, things are changing ...

For example: http://blog.arduino.cc/2015/04/30/microsoft-and-arduino-new-partnership/

Gadget999: I wanted to use interrupts to do the counting, do some calcs and then transmit the data via the serial port. Have you tried the max frequency you can count using interrupts ?

I have multiple sketches on that page. One counts frequency, the other period (and deduces frequency). You can actually get a higher max frequency by using the hardware to count, otherwise there is an unavoidable overhead of around 4µS to maybe 6 µS for the ISR to kick in, add one to a counter, and leave again. Meanwhile the hardware can count pretty much at the system clock rate (maybe half that) which is more like every 125 nS.

As I said above, the sketch I mentioned counts up to 8 MHz - that's half the system clock rate. I don't think you can better that. Using interrupts it would be more like 125 kHz if not less.

[quote author=Nick Gammon link=msg=2240652 date=1432154277] For example: http://blog.arduino.cc/2015/04/30/microsoft-and-arduino-new-partnership/ [/quote]

Yes, I've seen the press release; but I am not impressed. IMO little end-user good will come from this mess. Arduino.cc is in a bad place right now and Microsoft is looking (IMO) for any way to become relevant again.

Ray (Prior MCSE)

mrburnette: Yes, I've seen the press release; but I am not impressed. IMO little end-user good will come from this mess. Arduino.cc is in a bad place right now and Microsoft is looking (IMO) for any way to become relevant again.

Ray (Prior MCSE)

Microsoft will probably crap all over it and the open source idea. Everything since Windows 8 has just gone straight down the sewer.

i bought some of the mini maples and also came across this

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/STM8S103F3P6-ARM-STM8-Minimum-System-Development-Board-Module-Arduino-/141665178147?tfrom=141666141727&tpos=top&ttype=price&talgo=undefined

is it arduino ide compatible and is it just a counter chip ??


i do fear for the future of arduino if microsoft are involved, they have lost their grip on the pc world and may go for a grab of this technology

I would stay away from that board... a $2 pro-mini will serve you better.

Core Processor STM8 Core Size 8-Bit Speed 16MHz Connectivity I²C, IrDA, LIN, SPI, UART/USART Peripherals Brown-out Detect/Reset, POR, PWM, WDT Number of I/O 16 Program Memory Size 8KB (8K x 8) Program Memory Type FLASH EEPROM Size 640 x 8 RAM Size 1K x 8

=================== There is really much more going on in the ARM world than the processor... one must take into account the technology the chip manufacturer (Atmega, ST, etc.) is integrating via license from ARM for the Mx processor.

As you can determine from the above link - ARM M0+ is NOT ARM M3 ! Therefore, the M0+ being used in the new Arduino Zero will not perform the same as the ARM M3 used in the STM32F103 Maple boards being purchased for as low as $4 from China.

The other very serious issue is that the ATSAMD21J used in the Zero is significantly lower current per pin than the STM332F103CBT6 used in the Maple Mini. Always look at the sink/source CMOS driver I/O pins current capability! For example, the Zero can sink/source 7mA per pin... not even enough to brightly light a LED. The STM32F103 can sink/source is 25mA ... enough to easily supply a LED or even directly drive a small OLED display.

One must make an informed decision when purchasing Arduino "Genuino" products verses clone products. Advanced users will undoubtedly make a different decision than novices - well, at least I hope they do! IMO: a novice should not buy clones. The support simply is not available.

Another thing that goes deep into the technology is how the chip architecture is managed. Nothing can be more obvious that the memory address architecture: Von Neumann vs Harvard.

Access to integrated peripherals and "core" support for advanced feature such as DMA, I2S, and DAC must be considered in the light of usability. Unless you are competent on writing your own low-level driver code for a component, one should consider core and library and example code mandatory.

Often overlooked is the 3.3V design of the new chips. Interfacing can be a problem when using 5V sensors and other interfaces and can complicate a design. However, some chips such as the STM32F103 has a large number of 5V tolerant pins and thus can save time and component count in some situations. So two things must be considered: voltage levels of the pins and current capability of the pins.

As the new boards are introduced, clones will follow and the market will be even more complicated than today. So, if one does not know what they are doing - stay on the well supported path. Venturing off course into uncharted waters can easily cost you a great amount of frustration and even some significant money if you fry your board.

Ray