A board based on ARM Cortex?

I need to move on the a board with an arm cortex processor, for a few reasons.
My only 2 options are the Due and the Zero.

The problem is, that I would like to base a future product on this, and so the processor on the Zero is much smaller and cheaper, so it would be much better then the Due board.

The problem is, there is something strange about this board, nobody sell it, nobody barely talk about it, and it seems to me there is some kind of an issue with it not being successful .

So, I need your help, what are my options working on Arduino, with ARM based processor, that is also small in size and cheap for later use ? (is the Zero my only option? )

thanks.

Teensy ?

The problem is, there is something strange about [Arduino Zero], nobody sell it, nobody barely talk about it, and it seems to me there is some kind of an issue with it not being successful.

It is somewhat "new" as boards go, so there is less experience with it. It's also been the victim, more than usually, of the .org vs .cc schism, with the "Zero", "M0", and "M0 pro" all being somewhat different.

Teensy ?

Teensy3.x or Teensy LC (http://www.pjrc.com) is an excellent alternative. There is also the TI Tiva Launchpad(s) (Supported by the Energia Arduino look-alike IDE), which is an excellent value (although using a bigger, more expensive chip, rather like Due.)

BenStlr: what are my options working on Arduino, with ARM based processor, that is also small in size and cheap for later use ?

your demand for zero or due is direct contradiction of small/cheap so ignoring those atm:

http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=393589.0#new

cortex m3 programmable with arduino ide. not much bigger and lower cost than nano or promini. however personally i prefer the original arduino chips which have a much nicer instruction set than nasty arm.

even though this is not a new product somebody shuffled that thread of into nowhere land. i suspect by somebody who also sells non-official arduino products because arduino company seems pretty tolerant of competition. speaking of which im glad to see, aside from isolated hackers like ray, the org guys dont seem to be developing much of a community. certainly not on a par with this website.

i wonder if there are any real advantages to this 1.7.whatever stuff. specially in regards to these stm/cortex devices.

@john1993 I am not sure i see the contradiction here, you just showed me a link that says how cheap and small the processors on Zero(m0), so expect from the fact that there is no community around it, are there any other reasons not using it, and prepare it for a mass production use ? (your link says less the 3$ per chip so why should anyone keep using the old AVR's ?)

Also , your strange sentence "im glad to see, aside from isolated hackers like ray, the org guys dont seem to be developing much of a community" - and why you glad? because America should control everything all the time? It all started in Italy.

The first attempt at an ARM-based arduino was the Leaflabs "Maple", which had a bunch of problems trying to use vendor libraries, didn't sell very well, and was eventually abandoned by the original developers as they moved on to "more professional" projects. HOWEVER, their designs were open source, and were picked up by a number of manufacturers including Itead (https://www.itead.cc/iteadmaple.html), Seeed (http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/s/maple.html?search_in_description=0), and Baite (http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/leaflabs-Leaf-maple-mini-ARM-STM32-compatibility/213957_1400667476.html) as cheap friendly STM32 systems.

Roger Clark has relatively recently done a bunch of work bringing the software up-to-speed (http://stm32duino.com/)

Adafruit and Sparkfun also both have ARM boards based on the same processor used on the Arduino Zero (using the IDE, but not "branded" as Arduino.)

All things considered, you're in pretty good shape if you want an ARM programmable with an Arduino or Arduino-like IDE, if you're willing to step a bit beyond the normal vendors...

I'm not sure what that means, in the bigger picture.

a few corrections.

BenStlr: why you glad? because America should control everything all the time? It all started in Italy.

still italy. just a slightly different brand naming here vs there. the devices i referenced are chinese origin and the stm32duino guy is australian. very little american involvement anywhere. sounds like you got issues.

BenStlr: you just showed me a link that says how cheap and small the processors on Zero(m0)

nothing to do with zero product, that was your fixation. and these are cortex m3 not m0.

BenStlr: your link says less the 3$ per chip so why should anyone keep using the old AVR's ?

a dollar and change not 3$. boards not chips.

as mentioned i personally prefer the original arduino because more user friendly on several levels. however you have my permission to use a product that costs (literally) 10x more and much more difficult to use.

What about maple mini, using stm nucleo enviroment.

because America should control everything all the time?

-done with this thread now.