A Robot Arm

Hey, I am Arsalan, I am studying Mechanical Engineering and in a last year, so I need to submit my FYP, so after alot of consideration I decided to go with a Robotic Arm, its not something new but its a good way to learn about electornics and programming stuff.

I tried to find some topics on this but couldnt find one, here is the deal, I want control 5 servos (Futaba S3003) which will give me five degree of freedom (DOF), and I will be using arduino uno r3 to control it.

now my question is, is arduino uno r3 can control 5 servos? and if you have any guidelines, please help me.

Thank you

Youtube projects that might be of interest.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=robotic+arm+arduino&oq=robotic+arm+ar&gs_l=youtube.1.1.35i39j0.47963.55641.0.60531.14.14.0.0.0.0.119.1338.10j4.14.0...0.0...1ac.1.11.youtube.vgJhLUVjsHU

I tried to find some topics on this but couldnt find one

You didn't try very hard, then.

is arduino uno r3 can control 5 servos?

Yes.

Ok thank you for your response, I,ll update this post once my project is completed, for now, that yes by Paul is enough to get me on track.

is arduino uno r3 can control 5 servos?

Control? Yes. Power? No. You will need a separate power supply for the servos. Don't forget to connect its ground to the arduino's.

Hi, Some Servo information here: http://arduino-info.wikispaces.com/Servos

terryking228: Hi, Some Servo information here: http://arduino-info.wikispaces.com/Servos

Just noticed an error in there Terry: you say torque is measured in "ounces per inch or kilograms per centimetre" when it should "ounce inches or kilogram centimetres" with no "per". As you rightly show in your example, the product of the force and the distance is always 40: 40x1 or 80x0.5 or 20x2.

Thanks, Jimbo.. Here's what I say now:

Torque defines the maximum amount of rotational force the servo can apply. This specification is measured in force at some distance from the center of rotation. This is typically measured in ounce-inches of foot-pounds or in kilograms-centimeter (kg-cm). The larger the number, the more force the servo can exert. A typical standard servo will have a torque rating around 40 oz-in. A high torque specific servo can have torque values well over 200 oz-in.

ounce-inches of foot-pounds or in kilograms-centimeter (kg-cm)

I guess the "of" was intended to be "or". It's not a universal convention, but foot-pounds are commonly used as a unit of energy and pound-feet as a unit of torque.

hey howz u ? and how is your project .. i m a electrical final year student and i have to made FYP ... willl u help me if i try to make this project ?