Address help! Any Englishman?

Hedge End, Hampshire
SO30 0LZ

The USPS is really trying hard to make online purchase of international postage possible. In the past it was only possible with priority service and now they are extending to first class mail. The thing is, they probably don't know all those countries they have business with that well, neither do I :smiley:

So in an attempt to save time at the post office counter, I wanted to purchase postage to the above city. But the problem is that it is not listed in the list of cities in Hampshire on USPS. I even read a description of Hedge End on wiki (why should I?!) and found it belongs to Southampton Urban Area or SouthLeigh. But then when I selected the city to be Southampton or EastLeigh, the postal code is a drop-down list, not a box I can type. There is simply no SO3O OLZ!! I don't even know if these were zeros or O's. Anyway, does someone have a different city name I could try? Under Southampton there are SO3O 2 thru 4

Also if I get the first 4 characters of the post code correct, will it be sufficient? In US the full postal code is 5+4 but only the first 5 is needed. The last four, if I understand correctly, are numerical equivalent of street address.

OK, I realized I can skip postal code so I added the correct postal code in address line.

FYI, 3oz of package costs over $9 from US to UK now. It's just going to be harder to sell from US to the rest of the world.

Obama's taxes to reduce exports :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:

BTW, keep in mind that sometimes in EU there are local taxes applied to things that come from foreign countries (i.e. VAT and/or duty taxes). Ask your friend or alert him to check if he will have to pay something to the postman/carrier when he will receive the package

don't even know if these were zeros or O'

UK post codes go
Letter letter number number space number letter letter.

@Grumpy:
what about duty taxes in UK for US imports?

Grumpy_Mike:

don't even know if these were zeros or O'

UK post codes go
Letter letter number number space number letter letter.

So letter letter number number space number is incomplete then.

leo72:
what about duty taxes in UK for US imports?

There are two taxes:-

  1. Import duty,

The duty rates applied to imports into the United Kingdom typically range between 0% (for example books) and 17% (for example Wellington Boots). Some products, such as Laptops, Mobile Phones, Digital cameras and Video Game consoles, are duty free. However, certain goods may even be subject to additional duties depending on the country of manufacture, for example Bicycles made in China carry an additional (anti dumping) duty of 48.5%.

I imported a telescope some years ago and I was charged 8%.
EDIT - You no longer have to pay Customs duty for goods up to the value of £135,

  1. VAT - (Value Added Tax), this is currently 20% for most things but some things like books and food are 0% and some things like children's clothes are 5%. This is calculated after the import duty is added, so in some cases you are paying tax on the tax.

If some one sends you something by post then if the value is below £15 they don't bother collecting it. However if it is above then the Post Man will ask for it. However, when this happens a Post Office handling fee of £8.00 kicks in on top of any VAT. Also they charge you VAT on that handling fee.

So letter letter number number space number is incomplete then.

That code SO30 0LZ
is "s' "oh" "three" "zero" space "zero" "L" "Z" -- that last letter is zed not zee :stuck_out_tongue:
I had a look on google Maps, it is a typical new estate of houses, see on street view.

It amused me that you would consider something called "Hedge End" a city as to an English ear is sounds like the sleepiest of small villages. Something like population of 200, rather than a city population 80,000 +

VAT sounds like a barrier created to discourage competition from foreign countries and indulge mediocre products and services. Where is the free market in Europe, only from within?

OK I didn’t say I considered the place a city. It’s just in the city address field in paypal. It seems to be a small neighborhood name. Good thing I know now the UK postal code. Won’t make mistakes on numbers and letters anymore. The US system is all number and increases from 0XXXX to 9XXXX from east to west so I am sitting in the middle with 5XXXX.

VAT in UK, IVA in Italy, are not anti-import taxes, they are taxes by itself. They are (at least in Italy) applied on ANY product sold in the market. It's a tax to let the Government make more money, in my humble opinion they serve to reduce the circulation of money and, then, to block the economy because a product that costs 20€, with IVA in Italy costs 20€+22%. Too bad!

I visited New York a few years ago and in shops they added sales tax to everything I bought. All the prices were marked without tax so it was confusing. VAT is just the same, it is a sales tax it applies to everything any one sells.
It is a bit more complex because if you are a business you have to charge VAT on everything you sell, but you can claim it back on everything you buy. So the tax is only on the value added, hence the name.
So you are not being singled out it applies to us all.

I see. So it compares to sales tax in US, only here it varies by states and cities. If you do visit US next time, you can file a form at the time you depart from US to get all the tax back since you're not consuming the things you buy if you in tend to take them out of the country. It seems that you need to contact the state instead of federal tax agency for the refund:

https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/373

Some US states also charge no tax on the sales of some products or any product. If you purchase from a seller in state X and you live/use products in state Y, you may avoid paying tax, if the seller has no establishment in state Y, although some states ask you to pay use tax for things you purchase over certain amounts. Canada has higher tax AFAIK. I visited a couple cities there. It's like 20% tax. Also only before-tax prices are marked on the products.

If you do visit US next time, you can file a form at the time you depart from US to get all the tax back since you're not consuming the things you buy if you in tend to take them out of the country.

Yes it is the same in the EU (Europe ) . If you take stuff out you can get the tax back at the airport. But then they know you have it so you might get charges some import duty at the U.S. side.
http://www.dutycalculator.com/blog/tag/us-import-duty/

UK post codes go
Letter letter number number space number letter letter.

Apart from in London...

AWOL:

UK post codes go
Letter letter number number space number letter letter.

They can be letter letter number space number letter letter for the innermost districts.

Apart from in London...

Birmingham (B), Glasgow(G) and Manchester(M) all have single letter identifiers so they are letter number (number) space number letter letter. London can have either one or two letter identifiers followed by either one or two number districts and sometimes a letter after the number. EG. Broadcasting House's postcode is WC1A 1AA.

Grumpy_Mike:
I visited New York a few years ago and in shops they added sales tax to everything I bought. All the prices were marked without tax so it was confusing. VAT is just the same, it is a sales tax it applies to everything any one sells.
It is a bit more complex because if you are a business you have to charge VAT on everything you sell, but you can claim it back on everything you buy. So the tax is only on the value added, hence the name.
So you are not being singled out it applies to us all.

10% GST (Goods & Services Tax) in Australia applies to "new" items that are not "essential" such as food, medical care and whatever (clothing?, domestic rental?). GST on commercial supplies is claimed back from what must be paid on sales.

The legislation is supposed to make it illegal to advertise a price that does not include the GST as that is - of course always - false advertising. But - of course - such false advertising does manage to occur in some places.