Advice for novice on project of a remote controlled vehicle

Hello everyone,
I'm a novice regarding arduino and electronics. Currently I'm working on a product design project for university in which I would need to make a prototype
It would be an intelligent transport assistant that we fake by having it remote controlled.
Basically it would need to move at walking speed, be bluetooth controlled, and capable of carrying about 10-20 kg of weight. An RC guy suggested me these motors with a gearing stepdown https://www.rc-point.nl/index.php?item=robbe-power-755_40-12v--boot-_-truck-nr-1-4491-bulk--pakket&action=article&aid=10197&lang=nl but couldn't provide me with any knowledge on arduino compability. We want to include arduino as flexibility for future add-ons. I think I need a motor shield but I don't know how to check for compability.
Any suggestions on approach, motors batteries anything really.
Thank you,
Have a nice day

"Any suggestions on approach, motors batteries anything really."

Go to walmart, goodwill, or a second hand kids store and get a kids "ride on" toy. Use that as your mobile platform.

Ok reading it again is kind of annoying how general it is. We've done a first iteration as you told me with a remote control kid car, but it doesn't perform as good as we wish because it's not able to carry anything notable. My main concern is about motor shield compatibility with those 12v 4,5a motors. The arduino is needed as we have to implement also light and inputs.

Go to a RC shop and tke a look at the cars department. Or google for "rc car" or "rc tank"

"Ok reading it again is kind of annoying how general it is. We've done a first iteration as you told me with a remote control kid car, but it doesn't perform as good as we wish because it's not able to carry anything notable. "

That"s not what I said. Read it again. Below is an example of a "ride on" toy. The larger ones can hold two kids or a good bit of weight. If you are careful modifying them, you might put them back as bought and donate them when done.

zoomkat:
If you are careful modifying them, you might put them back as bought and donate them when done.

That's a nice idea.

...R

holdingpattern:
Design is not about what someone randomly suggests. Design is about doing some calculations to determine the motor's characteristics.

Why should deciding what motor to use be any different?

Alright, lets do some physics!

We know you need 10-20 kilos of "stuff" moved, plus the mass of your contraption on wheels.

In a perfect world, you could easily find the center of mass of your vehicle, but you don't have it built, so it's harder to know the force each wheel needs to take.

Human walking speed is about 1.4 m/s, so required acceleration from 0 m/s (no motion):
Vf = Vi + at
(Vf - Vi)/t = a

I'll assume we want fast acceleration, so the time to accelerate will be... 0.5 seconds:
(1.4 - 0)/.5 = 2.8 m/s^2

So lets say the mass of your cart is 10 kg, and the "stuff" is 20 kg, so a 30 kilo mass:
F = ma
30*2.8 = 84 N

That's the force you need to exert on this vehicle, so each wheel needs to be exerting 84 N (just to be on the safe side, they really need to exert less, but more is better than less in this case). So now for the problem with all this: unknown variables.

Even if we have the (rough approximate) of force, you still need to know the radius and mass of your wheels. You then use that to find the torque your motors need to propel the cart, and the torque to find the revolutions per second. After that, it's a matter of finding the necessary RPM of your motor (you'll also need the mass of it's shaft) and then you can purchase a motor with the necessary specs.

Currently I'm working on a product design project for university in which I would need to make a prototype

So find a professor or smart fella who can help, my math is just some back-of-the-envelope stuff so you understand the ideas of what variables you need now (If anyone sees a mistake or a better way to calculate this, feel free to add your thoughts). I guarantee that there's someone at your school who can teach you this, and you'll probably learn something along the way.

I'm a novice regarding arduino and electronics.

Well, there's Google and YouTube to teach you stuff, so it's easy to move from novice to experienced if you're willing to work (or too stupid to quit like me).

I think I need a motor shield but I don't know how to check for compatibility.

Oh yeah, you'll definitely need a shield. Arduino's can't run motors forwards and backwards, that's not possible with how they work. That's what a shield is for, it gives the Arduino extra switches so it can swap the flow of power from positive to negative, which changes the direction of rotation. The motors you'll need will take way too much power for the Arduino to supply, so the shield's relays will control the power for you. You're basically controlling high-power switches with the Arduino's little switches. As for compatibility, just check the ratings of whatever shields/relays you're using and see what their max voltage is. Google "high voltage Arduino H-bridge" for some relay setups and some info on how they work. Everything else you're doing seems simple enough, you and your team (if this is a group project) should be fine.

Out of curiosity, what class is this for, and do you have any pictures of what you've built?