Algebra Linear applications

Hey, i’m looking for some arduino project that apply algebra linear in the engineering field (Automation and Control mainly ).

I’ve searched here in the forum, but did not found something that I can use.

Thanks.

How do you mean "apply algebra linear in the engineering field"? Would

int x = a * b;

be linear enough?

You might want to explain your question a bit more.

When I was at college Linear algebra meant using eg Laplace transforms for such things as control theory and convolution analysis using eg dirac delta's and Heaviside's work...

have things changed?

  • extract your data and do the sums

regards

Allan

Alright alright

for(byte i = 0; i < sizeof(x); i++){
  y[i] = x[i]/2 +1;
}

But we still need more info for a decent answer…[/code]

Sorry guys for not being clear in my question.

I looking for some application of matrices operations, or system of linear equations and stuff like that.

Thats for an Algebra Linear class in my graduation in Engineering, but i'm 2 period and dont have enough knowledge to apply that stuff in some arduino project.

Well, I’ve forgotten most of the maths - you’ll just have to work at that!

As to applications, multivariable control theory is used to do such things as pointing a missile in the right direction by reading guidance information and internal accelerometers and varying the thrust vector of it’s rocket motor accordingly . One fun bit is that as the missile burns it’s fuel it gets lighter and it’s centre of gravity position changes , so the matrix defniing it’s dynamic response is continually changing !

You’'ll know that stability vs response time is always the big tradeoff, so this gets complicated…

All good fun…

regards

Allan.

SeanIazdi: Sorry guys for not being clear in my question.

I looking for some application of matrices operations, or system of linear equations and stuff like that.

Thats for an Algebra Linear class in my graduation in Engineering, but i'm 2 period and dont have enough knowledge to apply that stuff in some arduino project.

For this you will either need MATLAB or a Raspberry Pi, not an Arduino.

You might want to look into filtering (i.e. Kalman Filter, etc). That might be more like what you are looking for. There are many Arduino projects that use such filters (i.e. self balancing robots).

Early air-to-air missiles such as the NALAR back in the 60's didn't have monster modern processors! And they worked fine.

The flight computer on appollo 11's lander had less than the power of a modern pocket calculator - probably about that of an arduino nano.

You can do a lot with a little if you have to.

regards

Allan

Sean McCheaty has $500 He can spend all $500 and put in 1 hour to finish his project. But for every hour he actually puts in effort, he learns $10 worth of information he won't have to pay someone else to handle for him. Sean sells flowers at the market during the day and averages $12/hr but due to asthma can only work 4 hours a day. Sean's mom can help him learn twice as fast, but is only available 2 hours a day and will not cook dinner if she has to help Sean, and he will have to buy his own food. Assuming that he will spend $6 on dinner if the day is even numbered, and $8 on dinner if the day is odd numbered, is Sean adopted?

I can't tell if Sean is adopted - but if he's any sense he'll buckle down and learn - I guess he doesn't want to be selling flowers all his life!

regards

Allan.

But what are you trying to do? An app to find intersections or closest points?

allanhurst:
The flight computer on appollo 11’s lander had less than the power of a modern pocket calculator -
probably about that of an arduino nano.

They could have wished. What they had had more ROM than a Nano, 2K (of 15 bit words) RAM and a 43KHz clock.

http://www.doneyles.com/LM/Tales.html

My oh my,did they have problems!

What a story!

They had 34k words code memory, 2k of ram...... and a very slow clock

A little bit bigger than nano but far slower.

and piles of IO

wow

regards

Allan

And a real-time prioritizing OS that could do multiple buggy things at the same time.

If anybody cares "Digital Apollo" by Mindell is a good read on this.

Without giving it too much thought, why don't you build a touchpad. Take a square piece circuit board, and buy a resistive ink (google, 'em -- they exist).

Spray the bottom of the board with the ink. Attach conductors around the edge of the board. Now you have a bilinear problem to solve. If you touch an electrified stylus anywhere on the board, determine its position.

Just a quick point - I think there's some confusion here.

Linear algebra is not high school stuff.

To control engineers it is a means of solving simultaneous differential equations, generally by using parameters specified in (real,s) where s is the differential operator with respect to time. so s is d/dt, s^2 is d2/dt^2 etc

the point is you can manipulate these algebraically as polynomials, which is a lot easier than solving ordinary differential equations .

The simultaneous equations are arranged as matrices and vectors and mathematical methods are used to manipulate these.... check out Laplace transforms, eigenvectors , eigenvalues, hamiltonians, jacobi transforms, determinants etc etc.

regards

Allan

ps it's been years since I studied this stuff........

He's not that far in school yet so what are the chances he means linear algebraic equations?

allanhurst:
and piles of IO

Allan

What sort of transistor is needed to start a 1,000,000 Hp rocket engine i wonder.

Hi

as to how far the OP is - who knows? - perhaps he''ll tell us.

But it semed that some posters were confusing linear algebra with elementary algebra - not quite the same thing!

As for Appollo.........

The main booster was about 56 miilion HP, if you believe John Clark in 'Ignition - a history of the development of liquid rocket propellants'. He was Isaac Asimov's boss at NARTS. Marvellous book.

And as it was RP-1 (kerosene ) and liquid oxygen probably a hybergolic starting slug of di-ethyl zinc or something like it to light the fire.

The lander used (I think) nitric acid/N2O4 oxidiser and UDMH/MMH fuel, which are themselves hypergolic, and so no ignition is required.

but they must have driven the solenoids somehow - what with I wouldn't know......... were 2N3055's about then?

something beefier than a 2N3904, I guess!

regards

Allan