Alternative to Arduino IDE

Is there any normal alternative to terrbile Arduino IDE?

Did you have a programming question?

Use Atmel AVR Studio with a suitable programmer/debugger, such as the AVR Dragon.

@2xup
I think that is programming question. It's about IDE, with is used to programming.
@up
I havn't got any programmer at now. Is there any possibility to use Atmel Studio without programmer?

Is there any possibility to use Atmel Studio without programmer?

Is there any possibility of YOU doing some research? All the alternatives to the IDE have been extensively discussed.

Jeez, I just asked something. I know that is Visual Micro add-in for Atmel Studio or Visual Studio. But does not want to work with some of libraries. So, i'm just asking.

http://uecide.org/

amongst other features, it doesn't reset the board when you open the terminal 8)

"Is there an alternative to the Arduino IDE that will just work with all published examples, sketches, and libraries, with no programmer-class effort required?"
Probably not.
I doubt that there is even a version of the Official IDE that wil "just work" with "all published examples." 1.0 broke a lot of things, 1.5 broke some different things.

You're better off finding an IDE that you like, and asking for help about any bits that you can't get working.

westfw:
"Is there an alternative to the Arduino IDE that will just work with all published examples, sketches, and libraries, with no programmer-class effort required?"

Some of the commonly perceived problems and weaknesses in the standard IDE are more easily addressed than others.

The simplest and probably most effective bang-for-buck upgrade (buck being effort here) is to use an eternal programming editor rather than the "notepad" style editor built in to the IDE. That's just a matter of checking a box in the "preferences" menu. Then, you program in emacs (or whatever your taste is), and you just use the IDE to build/upload the objects files. Just remember to save the files before you press build, and all will be sweet. No code compatibility issues to worry about -- if the example doesn't work in the external editor, then it wouldn't have worked in the built-in editor anyway.

PaulS:
Is there any possibility of YOU doing some research? All the alternatives to the IDE have been extensively discussed.

Knock it off, please. This kind of attitude is not at all helpful here. If you want to RTFM someone, fine, but there's no excuse for the rudeness.

OP:

Most IDEs can be made to do what you want, to some degree... The flexible ones will have customizable build frameworks. However, none will have the unique features of the official IDE, which is a blessing and a curse. The atypical source code management "features" of the AIDE in particular -- things like the multi-tab source files, not having to reference standard header files, not having to write function prototypes -- you may be able to simulate some of it with templates, but you'll be better off just learning to code properly (if you're not already familiar with normal C development, that is).

As far as uploading code to your hardware, the bootloader method is rather specific to Arduino, but tools may exist to emulate that outside of the IDE. (I don't know what they would be, if they do exist, but someone probably does.) If you're not opposed to using ICSP (and foregoing the bootloader), that's already present in Atmel Studio. The degree to which that's plug-n-play varies somewhat depending on what programmer you use.

You'll have to set up your includes and libraries, and none of it will be quite as one-click as the official IDE, but again ... if you're OK with that, you're better off understanding more about how a build process typically works. Having it all hidden behind the curtain is OK for newbies and for those who have no interest in learning more about software development, but it does no favors to those with more advanced inclinations.

There are plenty of guides on the web about how to set up Atmel Studio as an Arduino development environment, so there's no need to reiterate here. If you have another preferred IDE (like Eclipse or whatever), search for that combo. Yes, it can be done -- which is all I think you needed to get out of this thread, until you get stuck somewhere (which you probably will). When that time comes, ask questions about your specific hurdle. Someone will have been there before and can get you through it.

BTW, I agree with Pico. Using the "external editor" preference works surprisingly well. If you have a favorite "powerful" editor, it is a big advantage when working on longer programs.