Ambitious Arduino newb.  Any help with USB?

Hi,

Really, not with the arduino, no way ;)

You are aware of AVR-USB which enables an AVR to act as a low-speed USB client device?

I wasn't. Thanks for the link.

Does this not mean it must be possible for an AVR to both receive and transmit the correct signals?

I only had a quick look at the USB-AVR page and I think you are right.

But on the other hand I can't really tell anymore what this thread is about ... It started out with a question about mimicing an USB-keyboard with the Arduino (not even sure if that is the right interpretation of the initial topic ?), to some sort of USB-signal catcher?/repeater? to creating a new USB-device!

My doesn't work statement applied to the repeater/capture thingy.

If you want to build some sort of standard device like your own USB-keyboard, mouse, rotary-encoder hardware etc. there are chips available where you simply add an USB-cable and some resistors/condensers and your keys : voila your own USB-keyboard, mouse, whatever.

If you want to take the hard road, or if you are in bad need of some really special features you could try USB-AVR and write your own Linux kernel driver (easy part) and Windows driver (hard part, you might end up in an asylum before you finished reading the docs of the Windows DDK).

Eberhard

But on the other hand I can't really tell anymore what this thread is about ... It started out with a question about mimicing an USB-keyboard with the Arduino (not even sure if that is the right interpretation of the initial topic ?), to some sort of USB-signal catcher?/repeater? to creating a new USB-device!

My understanding was the initial question was about using a USB keyboard for input to an Arduino, but the later extended explanation indicated the aim was to monitor USB communications. (Or relay them...)

My doesn't work statement applied to the repeater/capture thingy.

Yeah, I wonder if it's possible to create a monitoring device that doesn't have to act as a full host in order to sit in the middle (or in parallel).

If you want to build some sort of standard device like your own USB-keyboard, mouse, rotary-encoder hardware etc. there are chips available where you simply add an USB-cable and some resistors/condensers and your keys : voila your own USB-keyboard, mouse, whatever.

It's certainly possible to get AVR-USB to act as a standard HID device (i.e. no driver required) also--one of the demos does exactly that.

If you want to take the hard road, or if you are in bad need of some really special features you could try USB-AVR and write your own Linux kernel driver (easy part) and Windows driver (hard part, you might end up in an asylum before you finished reading the docs of the Windows DDK).

There are some solutions that use libusb which might be simpler...

My impression was that developing a software-only USB solution for the lowend AVR chips was hardwork, which would suggest that the OP has a lot of work ahead of them. :-)

--Phil.

Hi,

My doesn't work statement applied to the repeater/capture thingy.

Yeah, I wonder if it's possible to create a monitoring device that doesn't have to act as a full host in order to sit in the middle (or in parallel).

I think a monitoring device will record all the signals on the wire without being a device. Just tapping wires, and then interpreting the signals recorded. But it must be somewhat complicated, because google "usb analyzer diy" and other buzzwords lead to nothing. Usually some has already tried that if it could be done with household electronics :-)

If you want to build some sort of standard device like your own USB-keyboard, mouse, rotary-encoder hardware etc. there are chips available where you simply add an USB-cable and some resistors/condensers and your keys : voila your own USB-keyboard, mouse, whatever.

It's certainly possible to get AVR-USB to act as a standard HID device (i.e. no driver required) also--one of the demos does exactly that.

Yes, now doubt you can do that, but as I said for these uses there are chips where you simply have to connect some keys job done. But could be done, Yes!

If you want to take the hard road, or if you are in bad need of some really special features you could try USB-AVR and write your own Linux kernel driver (easy part) and Windows driver (hard part, you might end up in an asylum before you finished reading the docs of the Windows DDK).

There are some solutions that use libusb which might be simpler...

I had to rule out libusb on every project, because it is still at version 0.1.2 which doesn't support threads. But If you don't need threads it could be an option...

Eberhard

I know this is an old post. There is a keyboard usb chip available for the purpose of interfacing a microchip to enter data to PC thru keyboard

Easy Input by Rondovan Robotics

I think it is perfectly possible if you could get the clock speed right with a different board. I reckon this board will be able to do the job- 100mhz arm processot, and fat libs. c++ looks like the daddy. ;) http://www.coolcomponents.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=502