Analog 0-10V driver dimming

I'm working with an LED driver that I'd like to dim with an arduino. I'm still a novice at this on the circuit side so I'm not really sure where to start. I tried searching for answers but there are a lot of other use cases that didn't match mine 100% and a few that came close weren't specific enough for me to know what I actually needed to buy/use/do.

The driver expects 0-10V DC (tolerates an absolute max range of -20V to 20V). It will be in an "off" state below 0.5V (0.35-0.65V) and switch to an "on" state above 0.7V (0.55-0.85V) starting at 10%. It goes to 100% brightness above 9V so getting all the way to 10V is not strictly necessary. It outputs 10V DC, 300uA (200-450uA) on dim +. Yes, uA.

It also provides an auxiliary 12V DC (10.8-13.2V), 200mA. It says to get ground for it from dim- so I'm not sure how that affects dimming.

I need to control a few of these with a single arduino using as few pins as possible. The drivers will not be psychically close to each other or the arduino, the drivers will be a few feet apart and could be quite far from the arduino but not more than 20 feet. At present I don't have anything set up, so a blank slate so to speak. I will dim based on a variety of inputs such as time, temperature, etc.

As I said I'm still pretty new at the circuit design side so please don't just name a type of component. I'll need a model, etc. A link to where I could purchase it would be even better (US based).

Thanks in advance.

Does it work with PWM?

Does it default to full-brightness with the dimming-input unconnected?

The Arduino “analog output” is actually PWM.

You can “amplify” the 5V PWM output with a simple [u]transistor[/u] or [u]MOSFET driver[/u]. (The motor or solenoid is replaced by the dimming-input.)

If the LED is full-brightness without the dimming circuit connected that means it’s “pulled up” and you can simply connect the transistor’s collector or MOSFETs drain to the dimming-input.

If it isn’t on with the dimming input unconnected you’ll need to add a pull-up resistor connected to the 12V (~1k should work).

Since he load is non-inductive, you can leave-out the diode.

Since it’s low current, almost any NPN transistor or N-channel logic-level MOSFET should work.

DVDdoug:
Does it work with PWM?

Technically yes, but it must be programmed to do so and the programmer is fairly expensive for all that it is ($40-60).

DVDdoug:
Does it default to full-brightness with the dimming-input unconnected?

Yes. It even specifically says to leave it that way when not using dimming.

DVDdoug:
You can "amplify" the 5V PWM output with a simple [u]transistor[/u] or [u]MOSFET driver[/u]. (The motor or solenoid is replaced by the dimming-input.)

If the LED is full-brightness without the dimming circuit connected that means it's "pulled up" and you can simply connect the transistor's collector or MOSFETs drain to the dimming-input.

If it isn't on with the dimming input unconnected you'll need to add a pull-up resistor connected to the 12V (~1k should work).

Since he load is non-inductive, you can leave-out the diode.

Since it's low current, almost any NPN transistor or N-channel logic-level MOSFET should work.

I don't really know anything about those. I saw other threads mentioning them and tried to read up on them but it just added more things I didn't really understand.

Why not use a SPI DAC with an output that can give ~10V. Haven't tried it myself but from the looks of it the Linear Technology LTC1257 looks like it could work.