Analog transistorized computer

I invented a computer transistorized analogically, in which what matters is the position of the bit and not its sequence and can thus simulate a sound wave inside the processor. I would like with your help to manufacture this computer.

The Bar Sport section of this Forum is intended for jokes and other stupidities.

In any case, I can't see how the arrangements for manufacturing an analog device can have anything to do with Arduinos.

...R

“The Bar Sport section of this Forum is intended for jokes and other stupidities.”

Well the first post is quite stupid.

Robin2:
The Bar Sport section of this Forum is intended for jokes and other stupidities.

In any case, I can't see how the arrangements for manufacturing an analog device can have anything to do with Arduinos.

...R

Was originally in website I think. Mods moved it here for being ridiculous. Gives us a chance to have a little fun.

Personally I think OP should post his design here so we can get started. I'm dying to see it.

fmaneiras:
I invented a computer transistorized analogically, in which what matters is the position of the bit and not its sequence and can thus simulate a sound wave inside the processor. I would like with your help to manufacture this computer.

Do you have all the documentation and Gerber files to produce the circuit boards. We would be glad to build a bunch for you. Prepay before beginning, however.

Paul

Speaking of analog computers....

I recently took a tour of a Nike Hercules missile site near my town. Very interesting. Three of the guys who used to work there were tour guides.

The system used analog computers to calculate intercepts, etc.

From the deployment of Nike in 1954 to the mid 1970's, the Nike Computer was an analog computer. That means that distances, times, and other values were not digital bit representing numbers (like 12.3) but were (in this case) voltage values (like 12.3 volts).

I didn’t know that they carried a 20 kiloton nuke for taking out incoming bombers (if not by physical damage then by EMP), or that they were a good bargaining chip in the first SALT treaty. And they only had a 70 or 80 mile range! Could be configured for surface-to-surface, too, to target Soviet ships.

Among the five radars at the site, they had a 10 MW (peak pulse) acquisition radar, powered by klystrons, with a range of about 180 miles (this site is on a mountain top).

I also thought that the missiles were stored vertically in silos, but in fact they were stored horizontally in a warehouse-like building, rolled out on rails, raised to near vertical and fired.

Fascinating Cold War-era stuff.

Hi,
When I first went to University, they had an Analog Computer in one of the labs.
It was plagued by students cooking the op-amps that made up the integrators and differentiators.
I understand they used some expensive chips.

We were shown a demonstration of it one day, operating a chart recorder like you see on TV connected to lie detectors, just a simple under compensated PID to a step input.

Never got to use it, analog was phased out and digital computing was going strong when I got to that level.

Tom.... :slight_smile:

DaveEvans:
Speaking of analog computers…
Fascinating Cold War-era stuff.

And frightening. Imagine the rocket travelling 80 miles over the USA because the guidance went wrong?

I wonder will anyone ever do a serious study to find out if any of that Cold War nuclear expenditure actually served any useful purpose at all. In other words, would it have made any difference if the USA had given up nuclear weapons after the end of WW2?

Of course it would have made a difference to the people who got mega-rich building the damn things.

…R

Robin2:
I wonder will anyone ever do a serious study to find out if any of that Cold War nuclear expenditure actually served any useful purpose at all. In other words, would it have made any difference if the USA had given up nuclear weapons after the end of WW2?

Of course it would have made a difference to the people who got mega-rich building the damn things.

...R

Or advanced our technology like the space program did?
Tom... :slight_smile:

TomGeorge:
Or advanced our technology like the space program did?

That pre-supposes that technological advance is a good thing. I don't reckon people are any happier now than they were in 1018.

And the fact that "advance" has meant that there are now far more humans on the planet has been very bad for other species and the habitat in general.

...R

Robin2:
That pre-supposes that technological advance is a good thing. I don't reckon people are any happier now than they were in 1018.

Depends on whether they were serfs or lords, male or female, of the dominant religion in the area or not and several other factors.

Henry_Best:
Depends on whether they were serfs or lords, male or female, of the dominant religion in the area or not and several other factors.

Which one of those is any different today?

Sure they aren’t serfs and lords anymore, they’re CEO’s and peons, but the separation of those who have vs those who the “haves” exploit to maintain their “have” status is still there.

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Delta_G:
Which one of those is any different today?

Sure they aren’t serfs and lords anymore, they’re CEO’s and peons, but the separation of those who have vs those who the “haves” exploit to maintain their “have” status is still there.

The ‘peons’ can unionise, strike and/or change employers. Some can become self-employed. None of those options was available to serfs.

Henry_Best:
The 'peons' can unionise, strike and/or change employers.

It's an illusion. You're just going from one oppressor to another.

Some can become self-employed

The serfs were all self employed. The only difference was that they belonged to the land instead of the land belonging to them. They had to turn over some portion to the king. So do you with the income tax.

Henry_Best:
Depends on whether they were serfs or lords, male or female, of the dominant religion in the area or not and several other factors.

I believe it made no difference.

You are imagining how you would like (or not like) any of those roles. In 1000 years time somebody might consider your life to have been that of a serf (or whatever word will be used in 3018).

At any one time in history people live in that time and consider themselves to be at the cutting edge of progress.

...R