and i thought Maine, USA had some strange names.

just found "Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch". no, that's not me typing gibberish again, it is an actual place. imagine learning to spell that as a kid. :o :o :o :o

~Travis

Hi,
We have a travel agents TV advert here in Australia where the actor pronounces
"Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch"

Here how to say it;

But try in New Zealand and Canada

Tom... :slight_smile:

I did not either try to read it.

The name board is longer than the station platform.

(The name is really for tourists - locally it's just "Llanfair")

AWOL:
The name board is longer than the station platform.

(The name is really for tourists - locally it’s just “Llanfair”)

Or “Llanfair P.G.” to differentiate it from another nearby Llanfair.
Although the name is long, the place is small. Not much more than a village.
The station makes more from the sale of souvenir platform tickets than it does from fares.

According to Wikipedia it means;
“St Mary’s church in the hollow of the white hazel near to the fierce whirlpool of St Tysilio of the red cave”.

St. Tysilio was the second son of Brochfael Ysgythrog (of the Tusks)!

St. Tysilio was the second son of Brochfael Ysgythrog

...and his name is officially the worst rack in Scrabble

ardly:
According to Wikipedia it means;
"St Mary's church in the hollow of the white hazel near to the fierce whirlpool of St Tysilio of the red cave".

St. Tysilio was the second son of Brochfael Ysgythrog (of the Tusks)!

"Game of Thrones" ?
Just waiting for the three dragons to fly our of the red cave.....
Tom... :slight_smile: :o

For a flavour of town and place names, and a certain brand of British humour, I can recommend dipping into one of Douglas Adams’ lesser known works, The Meaning of Liff

The book is a dictionary of factual place names associated to fictional definitions. For instance the entry for my own town reads.

EMSWORTH (n.)

Measure of time and noiselessness defined as the moment between the
doors of a lift closing and it beginning to move.

One of my favourites is

DOLEGELLAU (n.)

The clump, or cluster, of bored, quietly enraged, mildly embarrassed
men waiting for their wives to come out of a changing room in a dress shop.

Not least because the horror it causes English speakers when they hear how the name is pronounced. Honestly, you could drive past the village signpost for a year and still think the locals are talking about somewhere else entirely - As many people do.