Any ideas what to do with a 4 channel wireless remote control kit

Any ideas what to do with this 4 channel wireless remote control kit without using relays? relays need 12volts and only have 9 volts to power them. the problem is the buttons are only momentary. Please post your ideas and code.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/201254854827

what i have in mind is to turn off and on the pulse generator connected to my mobis coil when a helicopter comes by

T1g28JXaBhXXXJS4g0_035419.jpg

the problem is the buttons are only momentary. how would i turn anything on and off without using a songle relay? maybe a transistor? i know nothing about transistors

if (analogRead(A0) = HIGH) {digitalWrite(Pin2, LOW);}

 if (analogRead(A0) = HIGH)  {digitalWrite(Pin2, LOW);}

I think you’re getting a little ahead of yourself. You haven’t even completed the hardware design (mod) and your writing code ? Why don’t you wait until your hardware is configured to address the code .

I think the SONGLE relays are overkill (the current is minuscule for the remote control button). An opto isolator would make more sense. If you have a meter you should try to measure the current when you short a button with the DMM in mA current mode. I’m guessing it is going to be 1 mA or less.

Closing external switch with opto-isolator

XD-YK04

Product characteristics :
Super-regenerative receiver module using LC oscillator circuit , containing amplification shaping, the data signal output is high signal decoded , extremely easy to use and inexpensive, it is widely used. With four decoded outputs ( also can be changed to six-way jog or interlocking output ) , easy to use ; frequency debugging easy , short lead times ; product quality, consistency, and cost-effective.

Receiver module has a wide receiver bandwidth, typically ± 10MHz, 315MHz factory usually tune in or 433.92MHZ ( if any special requirements to adjust the frequency adjustment range , the frequency of 266MHz ~ 433MHz.). Receiver module generally use DC5V power supply, adjustable voltage range of any special requirements .

there is no hardware or code. im just wondering wtf to do with this thing without using songle relays. any ideas what to use this for?

wait, i just found something that looks cool

damn, i have the M4, i should of got the T4.
nevermind, i close thread

You can use two digital port (1 for wireless pulse (INPUT) and other for the relay (output)

const int wireless = 2;
const int relay = 13;

https://photos.google.com/search/tra/photo/AF1QipNsJhG8hljrtfzXd1qXSLg79-TQMeCV6Vmi7U_4

Good luck !!!

You can use the output of the receiver as inputs for the Arduino, and then have the Arduino react to them by doing... anything an Arduino can do.

You could get relays that can be actuated with a lower voltage, or use a high enough voltage for the relays you're using.

You probably won't like this idea but you could use it to transmit some data in 4-bit BCD
(Binary coded decimal)

A : d=1,c=0,b=1,a=0
F :d=1,c=1,b=1,a=1

send the 4-bit code followed by a checksum, then send the next 4-bit code.
You would have to come up with a protocol to send the number of nibbles (4-bit numbers) you are sending. You would have to run some tests for speed and accuracy and delay times needed in between commands sent with the remote. (which could be hacked into an arduino interface using various methods.

raschemmel:
I think the SONGLE relays are overkill (the current is minuscule for the remote control button). An opto isolator would make more sense. If you have a meter you should try to measure the current when you short a button with the DMM in mA current mode. I'm guessing it is going to be 1 mA or less.

raschemmel:
You probably won't like this idea but you could use it to transmit some data. . .

@raschemmel, either you misunderstood the OP question or I did.

It seems like you're thinking of ways control the buttons (and the receiver) with a pair of Arduinos.

I think the OP just wants to push the buttons manually and use the Arduino with the receiver.

@raschemmel, either you misunderstood the OP question or I did.

It seems like you're thinking of ways control the buttons (and the receiver) with a pair of Arduinos.

I think the OP just wants to push the buttons manually and use the Arduino with the receiver.

DOOH !

raschemmel:
DOOH !

LOL

I mean really, what sort of person would take apart a perfectly good button pad and start soldering wires to it?

I wish I had made a video of this monstrosity. The relays clicking away as it banged out a text message were wonderful to hear.

Adafruit's FONA is so much more practical but not nearly as fun as this contraption.

Sorry for the off topic ramble TrailerTrash.

How about controlling some LED sequences with the buttons?

I used a five button fob to control a long strand of LEDs. My niece had to spend the last few month of a pregnancy in the hospital so I set up a strand of LEDs in her room. She could adjust the patterns and brightness with the fob. I thought it turned out well.

I hope you let us know how to use your new gadget.

I guess what it really comes down to is that any one who considers themselves to be a H/W Hacker doesn't simply look at a piece of electronics as such , but rather looks at any piece of electronics as a possible next hack. ("What can I can next ?") ...in the same sense that a graphitti artist doesn't just see a freeway overpass, they see what they might write on it, if you know what I mean.
Now that's not to say that it isn't noble to try to apply one's skills to help the those in need, (elderly, handicapped etc (not sure if that word is still politically correct. "Physically challenged" just doesn't quite say it for me, where as "handicapped" , though having it's origin from the phrase "cap in hand" might have some negative connotations, the parking spaces still bear that name. Go figure. They don't have "Physically challenged " parking spaces do they ? If someone knows the correct term , please jump in. Anyway, combining different technologies into a frankenstein contraption that gets the job done to help someone in need is the ultimate good application of one's hacking skills. I breadboarded a phonetic speech synthesizer, (the same chip Stephen Hawking's Synthesizer uses, based on a Navy Algorithm SP0256-AL2 , except I took great care in making the low pass filter and final stage amplifier , using high quality mylar caps and a modified keyboard. I can't find the exact schematic for my circuit but it was almost exactly like this one except instead of the uP chip you see on the left , I had a serial PC keyboard wired to a UART serial to parallel converter chip, so when you hit a key it latched in that letter info the UART which output it into the SP0256-AL2. As I recall , it did not speak the word or words until you hit the enter key. My friend came over and saw it and asked me how much I wanted for it and said it wasn't for sale because I just spent the last two days getting it dialed in. He then said he wanted it for someone in a wheelchair so I said I would let it go for the cost of the parts ($50). He said "bag it up" and I pulled the parts out of the breadboard, put them in a brown paper bag with the schematic and he gave me $50. Just to be clear, he was the one doing the good deed. I was just caught in the middle.