Arduino 12v DC Electromagnetic lock control - Failsafe or not?

As the topic suggests.
I have this eletromagnetic lock I've installed on my front door with a relay.
It's all working ok, and If the electricity were to go off, the door would unlock.

It disactives from inside with a normal switch and from the outside with a phone that connects to a webclient.

Question is: what if the router isn't working? Am I locked out?
There must be a failsafe solution in this case... like a loopback check on lan.

Any ideas? Thanks

joerack:
Question is: what if the router isn't working? Am I locked out?

I'm sure you will find clues in the data sheet of the actual lock on how your particular lock would deal with this.

There must be a failsafe solution in this case... like a loopback check on lan.

For my home: the RCB is on the outside wall. Could just trip it, power goes out, and such a lock opens. Now I wouldn't say that "lock opens when power out" isn't exactly fail safe in itself. How about a physical key as backup?

Now I wouldn't say that "lock opens when power out" isn't exactly fail safe in itself.

Yes having worked in the access control industry this is fail safe.
The opposite when the power is out and the door remains locked is fail secure.

Secure is not safe when you consider what happens in a fire.

Hi,
Aren't the automatic door locks, just solenoid controlled latch, and you still have a standard lock and tongue connected to it?
So you can use a KEY?

I hope you are not being BLONDE and can't get into your car because the remote battery is flat!!!!!!!!! :o :o

Tom... :slight_smile:

In case of a house lock (as OP has), there could be an easy manual override on the inside, so at least you can get out without power or needing your phone or whatever.

Still doesn't let rescuers in, of course, but for that matter it's on par with a traditional lock which also doesn't open upon power outage.

And indeed arriving home with a flat battery in your phone (especially with the still pretty terrible battery life of modern day phones) is something that's likely to happen much more often, or at least is more likely, than the power being out or the router tripping up.