Arduino and G programming

Since Arduino targets a large audience why not make it even more intuitive by making it a Graphical programming language like Labview or as an option of text base or graphical? I use Labview and just love it and I think many people would agree with me! But I would like to say Arduino is awesome as is and much thanks to the developers.

Rico Bravo

Not a great fan of graphical environments myself (very low information content per unit area of screen) but be sure to let us know how you get on.

I am 10 brain cells short of having the ability to do it myself, but if Arduino offered a graphical base option for programming like Labview, Arduino would take the world by storm!!!

Rico Bravo :o

See Rico Bravo, those who can are too busy with other things and those who can't, well they can't. That's the spirit of open source at work. If nobody is interested in taking the world by storm, the world won't be taken. On a more practical side, except being cool, the graphical environment needs to solve a problem for those who drive the development. If it doesn't it won't happen.

There are a few initiative which offer limited graphical programming of the Arduino, you might want to check those out.

Korman

Since Arduino targets a large audience why not make it even more intuitive by making it a Graphical programming language like Labview or as an option of text base or graphical? I use Labview and just love it and I think many people would agree with me! But I would like to say Arduino is awesome as is and much thanks to the developers.

Labview apparently has no customer support (from the number of help post here) for the $$$$ that is paid for the product (I don’t know what it cost as I would have to request a “quote”). The below is a new product that might be of interest, but appears to be a little “new age” for me.

http://www.dsprobotics.com/

I use Labview and just love it and I think many people would agree with me!

Graphical/Visual programming environments for embedded control are nothing new; they've been around in one form or another for many decades (ladder-logic diagrams are probably one of the oldest forms).

But you have to ask yourself:

If such environments are really the "best thing since sliced bread", then why don't you see more software developers for embedded systems using them? Its not because they are unknown...

To put it another way: Atmel and Microchip are arguably the two main competitors selling various microcontroller families for embedded electronic development. There are tons of adherents, developers, and users for both. They all want nothing more than a stable, easy to use, and quick to develop software on platform and coding environment. So why is it, do you suppose, that all of these developers are either using C/C++, BASIC, or Assembler to develop software for these microcontrollers, instead of using a graphical/visual system like Labview...?

I am also NOT a fan of graphical systems. HOWEVER, your wish has been answered

http://www.modk.it/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9U3lMmpzL4

The reason REAL programmers or programmers with lots of experience dont like/use graphical systems is because they hide too much of what is going on. They tend to work fine for simple stuff but get in the way for more complex projects.

Mark

That's pretty neat for beginners. Would sure make keeping track of curly brackets and semicolons easier, I shoot myself in the foot sometimes with those. Have definitely been getting better at it - at first the compiler couldn't even keep up with me! Now the errors are down to the managable level so I get good enough error messages that I can find what I did wrong (usually a missing semicolon still, or a name misspelled).

Kind of like Lego's Drag & Drop programming for the NXT Brick thing what ever they call it. That was good for setting up multiple sensors.

Would definitely be burdensome if had anything more than a page or 2 long to look at.

Oh, and you can't save it locally - if your internet goes down, you're done for the day!

So, go get all the free opensource stuff at arduinio.cc, then come buy our software to work over the top of that! (Unless you have Internet Explorer, in which case go get another broswer too)

I suppose it's legal ...