Arduino and Money

pert: Maybe related to the MicroChip buyout. I'm glad I didn't notice the price go up,

It didn't for all sources unless it happened before 2012. Blame Obama.

Yep, it must have been Obama trying to take away my 42nd amendment right to bear microcontrollers.

If we can’t blame Obama then we might start seeing what’s really going on.

You're right, I see it now. It was the Russians!

Or just a few thousand internationals playing the rest of the world off on each other.

Looks like the OP made a $million after his Original Post and does not need our help anymore :slight_smile:

…R

Or got bored with fishing here.

GoForSmoke: Or got bored with fishing here.

I like your thinking, it is just about good BASS fishing weather again, maybe I can make my millions adapting Arduino to that somehow....

here fishy fishy fishy......

Pic Attached.

Fish with Arduino.jpg|802x540

If it works, then that Nano probably costs at most a quarter of the cost of a good store-bought lure.

|500x336

Going to have to try a Nano next time I go fishing.

Wouldn't the flashing LED 13 be illegal?

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birddog: ...here fishy fishy fishy......

Pic Attached.

I thought only AVRs were good for this application. Something about register orthogonality makes the PIC chips poor lures.

ChrisTenone: makes the PIC chips poor lures.

Well they did not manage to lure the Arduino founders away from Atmel chips.

...R

Robin2: Well they did not manage to lure the Arduino founders away from Atmel chips.

...R

Both AVR and PIC serve the education and hobby markets. The hobby market is dominated by AVR, while education splits them about evenly: microprocessor courses taught in computer science or business departments most often use PIC. STEM and physics programs tend toward AVR, while engineering can go either way. ... or neither.

Banzi and the other's choice of AVR is rooted in history and is unlikely to ever change to PIC, solely due to the product manufacturer's merger, or the machine architecture. All the growth seems to be 'vertically', away from 8 bit processors. Hobby and education markets will hold on to 8 bit processors for a long time. My money is on AVR to be the last chip standing, but who knows the future plans of Microchip for the two, "competing" product lines?


Fish are attracted to a more organic lure though. AVR - particularly Arduino - has that, right?

birddog:
I like your thinking, it is just about good BASS fishing weather again, maybe I can make my millions adapting Arduino to that somehow…

here fishy fishy fishy…

Pic Attached.

Fish and chips?

ChrisTenone: Both AVR and PIC ....

Sorry. I was just trying to have some fun with the word "lure"

...R

ChrisTenone: . My money is on AVR to be the last chip standing, but who knows the future plans of Microchip for the two, "competing" product lines?

Used to use PIC quite a lot.

Thing about AVR for me is that the forum has a much better 'feel' to it than the microchip forum.

I have had these ideas, but have failed to get any investors behind them. Feel free to implement them if you can. I will not seek royalties.

**PLUS ** = Automatic shaver

**PLUS ** = You get the idea

Delta_G:
It’s a reference to an episode of South Park.

You mean an Arduino is “about tree-fiddy”?

birddog: I have had these ideas, but have failed to get any investors behind them. Feel free to implement them if you can. I will not seek royalties.

PLUS ** **= Automatic shaver

PLUS ** **= You get the idea

I [u]won't[/u] be volunteering to beta test either of those.

What happens if the two get integrated? ???

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Both AVR and PIC serve the education and hobby markets. The hobby market is dominated by AVR

This is a relatively recent phenomena. Pre-Arduino, the hobby market was dominated by PICs (and obsolete PICs at that), and the "easy" hobbyist market targeted by Arduino was probably dominated by "The BASIC Stamp" from Parallax. A bit before that (and occasionally since Arduino), Atmel AVRs were difficult to obtain from hobbyist-friendly dealers, and many of the semi-pro dealers (digikey/etc) didn't carry them. Usually programmed in Assembly Language; I remember ordering some ATmega48s as my AVRs with "lots of flash space" - the usual candidates with A90S2313 with 2k... (although - I notice that my perception of "relatively recent" is stretching out as I get older. Have I really been doing Arduino Stuff for a decade, now? Ouch!)

while education splits them about evenly: microprocessor courses taught in computer science or business departments most often use PIC.

(microprocessor courses in business departments???!!!) Microprocessor courses are relatively rare in general. :-( I'm not sure you can derive meaningful statistics.

All the growth seems to be 'vertically', away from 8 bit processors.

Indeed. PIC32 has more Arduino stuff than AVR32, but ARM is winning out. Some part of me is half-expecting PIC and AVR to both die out as "odd proprietary architectures", leaving behind a bunch of 8051 derivatives for the 8bit crowd, and everyone else moved to ARM/etc. (8051 and ARM both being architectures supported by "many" vendors.)