Arduino Controlled analog mixer

Hi!
I have multiple speaker-settings in my room and in my bathroom, and now i just have them connected to a digital mixer, that can handle monitor outputs, but as soon as the pandemic thing is nearly over i want to hire it out again, and listen to music at the same time! I have a fully processed stereo mix comming in to the mixer, but i need some arduino hardware to control its outputs!

What i need:
a piece of hardware (some sort of chip) that let arduino controll audio volume for different speakers.
2 analog signals split up to 16 analog outputs, controlled with arduino (via internet, but i can code).
What hardware to use? In worst case scenario, i glue servo's to pots, because its literately recalling of presaved presets, but there must be a cleaner way, to dampen the audiosignal, without signal loss ofcourse. If the audio dampens if another speakers comes up, its fine. I'll need to adjust volume after an speakerchange anyways.

I dont know if dampening is the correct opposite of amplify, but you are all smart humans so you'll figure it out!

thanx!

(edit)
After a bit more searching i came across this:
https://www.maximintegrated.com/en/design/technical-documents/tutorials/1/1828.html
Would this work by any chance? I was looking at example 4. I dont fully understand what the disadvantages would be, could anyone explain?

In worst case scenario, i glue servo's to pots, because its literately recalling of presaved presets,

Most mixers don't have 16 separate outputs... And if you have a mixer with that much capability/flexibility you probably don't want to glue stuff to it!

If you want build something from scratch, there are digital pots or volume control ICs or digitally-controlled amplifiers. If you go with digital pots, make sure they work with AC (or bias your signals) and make sure they can switch noiselessly.

[u]TI[/u] has a good selection of audio related ICs.

I dont know if dampening is the correct opposite of amplify

The opposite of amplification is attenuation. Most audio amplifiers that have a volume control can go all they way down to zero (silence) or you can build an op-amp "amplifier" circuit with a gain of less than 1.

I have multiple speaker-settings in my room and in my bathroom

"Traditionally" each room would have a volume control knob on the wall so whoever is in the room can adjust the volume. Or, you could have a separate small (or large) sound system in each room.

Look at motorized pots at Digikey.

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/bourns-inc/PSM60-081A-103B2/PSM60-081A-103B2-ND/5825441

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/bourns-inc/PSM01-081A-103B2/PSM01-081A-103B2-ND/3694106

DVDdoug:
Most mixers don’t have 16 separate outputs… And if you have a mixer with that much capability/flexibility you probably don’t want to glue stuff to it!

I have an qu 16 with stagerack, so i’m all set. But i indeed want to build something out of scratch.
thanx for the reply

CrossRoads:
Look at motorized pots at Digikey.

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/bourns-inc/PSM60-081A-103B2/PSM60-081A-103B2-ND/5825441

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/bourns-inc/PSM01-081A-103B2/PSM01-081A-103B2-ND/3694106

thanx, but those things are hella expensive!

Does anyone know of a cheaper alternative? What would happen if i use some MCP 4151 for this?

You need a digipot designed for audio - such devices have zero-crossing detect to prevent zipper noise on changing the value.

Purely passive attenuation has issues though, its better to use something like the Baxandall configuration for
a volume control with gain as well as attenuation, and buffered inputs and outputs - more universal,
compatible with linear taper potentiometers.

For instance circuit 6 here: ESP - A Better Volume Control
You can have a single input buffer to drive several of these (or for just a bare pot).

Input buffering allows the use of low impedance pots (5k or 10k), which will avoid the risk of adding noise
(once upto 100k or higher this is an issue).

There's many ways to go of varying complexity and performance.