Arduino-dependant to independant prototype

I just finished reading the “Getting started with Arduino” book and was left with a couple questions. How do you take your Arduino-dependant projects and make them independent? For example, at the end of the book there is an example project with a color changing lamp. The instructions seem to indicate you have to basically strap the whole Arduino board onto the project. Is it assumed that you’ll have to keep the Arduino board around for your finished prototype? Does the Arduino flash other chips (like the AVR USBTiny)? Hopefully this makes sense :slight_smile: Thanks for any help!

You are free to just adapt the Arduino development board to your final project once you have the software done.

However many then get a minimum type support board that they then wire into thier final project. One can purchase replacement AVR microprocessors (with the bootloader) from several vendors.

http://store.fundamentallogic.com/ecom/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=15&products_id=29

The Arduino platform gives you lots of options.

Lefty

If I want to have a permanent project without the Arduino board I developed it on I just make up the equivalent circuit on strip board. This is worth while especially if you can leave bits out like the USB / serial chips. A simple processor, crystal, two capacitors and a pull up resistor on the reset is all you need.

mike, I have seen some arduino minimum hardware tutorials, but they all seem to either differ or be terribly bad at explaining how to expand upon them… can you please post a decent place I can learn to do what your describing (with pictures and an explanation please… ) if you know such a link?

it would be greatly appreciated :slight_smile:

Well there is not much to say about it, you just use the Atmega chip just like any other chip and build your circuit round it. If you look at my latest project Econo Monome you will see I did just that. At the bottom of the schematic is the Atmega chip with a crystal, pull up resistor on the reset line and a decoupling capacitor on the supply.

terribly bad at explaining how to expand upon them.

I am not sure what you mean here because once you have you processor chip you just add stuff on like you normally would if it were an “proper” unit.
As I said before if you want something like a MIDI output on the Monome then you would miss out the USB / Serial chip and wire the serial lines straight to the MIDI interface circuits.

Maybe because all this is so natural to me I haven’t looked at any sites telling you how to do it.

A breadboard based arduino is an excellent idea like this one:

http://oomlout.com/blog/2009/04/breadboard_based_arduino_compa_1.html

They have a UK shop but they are not selling the kit at the moment:

This allows you to customize the prototype environment as well as easily programming the chip and pull it straight out.

I was having exactly the same question also… As I am newbie and just starting with Arduino - let me ask if I get the whole idea right:

  1. I would make my project protype using normal Arduino board, make it properly run with all needed extra HW like LEDs and so on;
  2. When I am done with prototyping - I would get 2nd chip for my board like ATmega328 or similar (depending on the board), put the chip on the Arduino board and upload my “prototype software” into it
  3. take it out and put on some simple board, add needed few resistors, capacitors and whatever is needed there (so it works similar way as Arduino did), connect my prototype schema (e.g. LEDs) to it, as it was connected to original Arduino board - and then it should run?

Not sure if I expressed myself clear, but somehow for me is still not clear - how would I convert my prototype, which runs with Arduino into something, what needs no Arduino, but uses e.g. ATmega328 + something instead, and what is exact way how I could put my software on this external ATmega328 chip?

Thanks for any hints clarifying this mess in my head :-/

  1. I would make my project protype using normal Arduino board, make it properly run with all needed extra HW like LEDs and so on;
  2. When I am done with prototyping - I would get 2nd chip for my board like ATmega328 or similar (depending on the board), put the chip on the Arduino board and upload my “prototype software” into it
  3. take it out and put on some simple board, add needed few resistors, capacitors and whatever is needed there (so it works similar way as Arduino did), connect my prototype schema (e.g. LEDs) to it, as it was connected to original Arduino board - and then it should run?

Yes you have it right. Besides the resistors + capacitors you mention you will also need a crystal so that it runs at the same speed.

You get your code onto the new arduino chip the same way you have been putting it onto your original one, BUT, that requires a bootloader. You can either

[1] burn the bootloader (using the arduino IDE, very simple) using an additional peice of external hardware, called an ISP programmer,

or

[2] Unsure the bootloader comes pre-burnt when you buy the new chip. There are many manufacturers which sell chips with the bootloader already on them.

cunami,

Perhaps your confusion lies with your definition of “Arduino” and this is understandable.

One way to look at it is that “Arduino” is this forum, the programming environment (IDE), and the various pre-made boards. It is also the bootloader code that is put on the chip, but it is not ATmega chip per se.

You got it - you can use the Arduino environment to set up a chip (normally with a bootloader on it) and then pull it and put it on a board that gives it simple life support.

(What a great candidate topic for a sticky or pre-post FAQ! :-X)

It depends on what the final project is. If it is something that needs connection with the computer to work then you have to include some sort of USB to serial chip as well. If it doesn’t need to talk to a computer it can be quite simple.
This project is an example of the latter. Econo Monome

You can do two things, either program it in the
chip in the arduino board and transfer it to your project, or put a header on your project that is essentially just the serial lines and programme it “in circuit”. To do this you need the USB to serial bit between the header and the computer but you can use that bit again on the next project as it is not a permanent part of the installation.

If you are after a breadboard Arduino kit we will have them in stock this weekend at the Earthshine Design store - www.EarthshineDesign.co.uk