Arduino driving a large current via...

I want to drive two Luxeon LEDs, each of
which will max out at 1500ma.

What type of component do I need to look
at to put between the arduino and the
Luxeons to handle the current, since the
FAQ basically says the arduino's outputs will
handle at most 40ma?

Thanks.

Use mosfets to switch that amount of current. Be sure to get ones with logic level gate drive. How many volts do the LEDs need?

Datasheet shows min 2.79v, avg 3.42v, max 4.23v.

Suggestions on incorporating a short distance (3-4m)
wireless remote to the arduino (XBee perhaps, from
the little I've picked up so far...), or should that Q be
posted in a different forum?

Suggestions on incorporating a short distance (3-4m)
wireless remote to the arduino (XBee perhaps, from
the little I've picked up so far...), or should that Q be
posted in a different forum?

What about just a small, cheap RF pair?

OK so they are just LEDs, with no built-in drivers. The simple way to drive a LED is with a series resistor, but this is very inefficient for high current LEDs such as those, and the actual current you get will vary with the supply voltage and the LED itself. You can make a constant current driver using a mosfet and a bipolar transistor, which gets round the problem of the current being variable, but is still inefficient (the excess power will be dissipated in the mosfet, which will need a heatsink). Preferably, these LEDs should be driven by a constant current switching regulator.

Arrch:

Suggestions on incorporating a short distance (3-4m)
wireless remote to the arduino (XBee perhaps, from
the little I've picked up so far...), or should that Q be
posted in a different forum?

What about just a small, cheap RF pair?

That'd be excellent. What are the sources for these
kind of things. (In my previous job we used to call
this COTS--commercial off the shelf.)

dc42:
OK so they are just LEDs, with no built-in drivers. The simple way to drive a LED is with a series resistor, but this is very inefficient for high current LEDs such as those, and the actual current you get will vary with the supply voltage and the LED itself. You can make a constant current driver using a mosfet and a bipolar transistor, which gets round the problem of the current being variable, but is still inefficient (the excess power will be dissipated in the mosfet, which will need a heatsink). Preferably, these LEDs should be driven by a constant current switching regulator.

I knew about the series resistor, but at the same time I’m all for
learning about efficiency, so thanks for the teaching.

Is the constant current switching regulator a prefabbed circuit,
an SMT device, a discrete component, or is that something that has
to be custom built for each application?

Never mind, a quick google search turned up a likely candidate via digikey:
http://www.digikey.com/us/en/ph/ONSemi/NCP3066.html
NCP3066PGOS-ND | NCP3066PG | IC REG SW CONST CURR 1.5A 8-DIP