Arduino Due Obsolete?

programmable with the Arduino IDE? awesome! Do you have more details? is it already available?

edit, now I understand, you mean what you mentioned above...

Teensy is in development with a 180 MHz Cortex-M4F chip. A more powerful ESP chip is also coming. These 3 are probably the near-term future for people wanting more powerful Arduino-compatible boards.

I thought by Teensy you would mean a current Teensy ARM core board. https://www.pjrc.com/teensy/

ArthurD: is it already available?

Not quite. Beta testing now.

yes, I assumed it would be that way.

Anyway: 1st) I would expect full support for the Due board nevertheless, and 2nd) actually, on the long run, both the Due and all the Teensies will be far too small, too:

Just a Board compareable to the Raspberry Pi or the BeagleBone Blue (Quadcore, 32-64bit, 1GB, 1GHz, ~70-80 GPIOs) would be powerful enough for my requirements (or the vanished Arduino Tre, but also powered then by a quadcore instead):

All Features like GPIOs, I2C, UART, SPI, CAN, HDMI TFT display (+ resolution settings), audio/sound, SD file r/w access, WiFi, BT, USB communication + devices, and everything accessable via the 1 and only simple Arduino IDE.

No makefile, cmake, make at all, just simple #include the libs which are needed.

Things like the RPi and BBB are nice but they have kind of a downside. Yes, they have very fast processors, much more RAM, etc but one tends to be abstracted a very long way away from the bare metal. The fact that you tend to be running linux means that your latency can be worse than on a Due because anything that happens has to bubble down through all the abstraction layers. Also, I know a lot of people have trouble doing direct access to hardware ports on something like a Due but at least you can. On the bigger stuff there are protection systems as well so you have to write kernel mode drivers for direct access. Anyway, my point is that complication goes up dramatically when you go to those faster, more capable products.

But, if someone built a board with a 2GHz processor, 4GB of RAM, and a boatload of features but they didn't use linux or at least built an Arduino like environment on top I would probably be interested. Some things are fine and well with a Due. Other things maybe could use more power. Yeah, RPi has python so it's kind of similar but really I'd like something like RPi but instead of focusing on video focus on being a direct metal version like Arduino where there is a shiny veneer over top but nothing stops you from going straight to the metal if you want. Of course, as processors get faster and more feature rich they also become more difficult to work with at a low level. But, even a Cortex M7 might work. Those are something like 300MHz aren't they? They've got a lot more features than the M3 in the Due but they're still in a same general ballpark just faster and a bit more feature rich. Heck, even add some externally connected RAM and really up the ante. This isn't quite so stark a change as going to a quad core monster and easier to work with.

some things work with small processors, some don't (neural nets, speech recognition by FFT cross correlation, full-HD multimedia,...) Using libs on the PI like joan's pigpio, you may work already extremely quick on the Pi's proprietary GPIO pins, and using pthread by thread priorities you can come quite close to real-time behaviour - not to talk about real-time kernels. OTOH, attaching additional hook-up AVR- and ARM-boards (e.g., Propeller-HAT or even additional MCUs integrated on the backpane as on the BBBlue or once planned on the TRE or even on the YUN) you can have the best of 2 worlds.

All depends on what you intend to do, no question. For a hen flap a AVR will do, for a neural net a 64bit 1GHz 1GB quadcore might even bend your knees...

The IDEs and the API libs will make the difference in the end.

And not to forget: I am finally not known to be a friend of Linux or Python. So why not have a bare-metal 64bit-super-quadcore powered by a Arduino IDE? Or perhaps even driven by Windows 10?

But back to topic: The Due is highly neglected currently IMO, but eventually: it's already available, and so it's actually not a long way off.

ArthurD: But back to topic: The Due is highly neglected currently IMO,

Well, Due has officially moved to Arduino.cc's retired products list. Hard to imagine new development is going to happen for a retired product...

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/Products#retired

Arduino.org still lists it as a current product and some distributors like Sparkfun appear to be stocking it, so at least it seems the hardware will be still be available for a while (if you discount rumors of Atmel dropping this chip). But the dot org folks so far don't seem to have done any meaningful software development for Due, and their efforts for boards like M0 Pro pale in comparison to the much better software work from Arduino.cc.

It'll be really interesting to see whether the dot org folks manage to publish decent software support for their upcoming products using ST and Nordic chips. As far as I can tell, these are their first products where they can't simply copy from Arduino.cc. But perhaps they'll leverage the already-developed STM32 core library or older stuff from Maple?

perhaps they'll leverage the already-developed STM32 core library or older stuff from Maple?

Don't forget http://stm32duino.com/ where Roger Clark and others have been updating/replacing the old Maple code with much more modern and generally capable versions. I've long thought that what arduino.org needed to do was actively recruit some of the more cluefull developers from the forums. Perhaps they have... (but it looks like not: http://stm32duino.com/viewtopic.php?f=31&t=1115&p=14863

well, I have 2 Dues and I'm rather fine with their performance and the number of IOs. Just a better suppport by Arduino.cc libs and shilelds would be wishful. Most Arduino shields regrettably don't work on the Due, just on the Uno.

Hi there,

I havent tried to buy a Due in a while now. When i got mine i was a little put off that it was 3.3v only, and will burn out if we apply a pullup to +5v for example. Some CPU's are 5v tolerant even though they run on 3.3v normally.

But aside from that, it's a pretty interesting board. I hope to start using mine soon. I look forward especially to the 12 bit ADC and also the 12 bit DAC, which dosent come on any other boards. I just have to rig up a good interface that goes from 3.3 to 5v for some devices i need. I am on my way but it will take a little longer yet, especially since i just got a Mega the other day and want to work with that a little first. That's a really awesome board with lots of i/o's and it is 5v so i can connect all my usual stuff to it. The memory in that thing is enormous.

MrAl: Some CPU's are 5v tolerant even though they run on 3.3v normally. ...... I look forward especially to the 12 bit ADC and also the 12 bit DAC, which dosent come on any other boards.

Oh, there might indeed be a board with about the same performance as Due with very good Arduino compatibility & support, with 12 bit ADC & DAC and even 5V tolerance on its I/O pins....

…and providing 80 GPIOs, not to forget… :wink:

Really frustrating to hear this…im developing a product based on the Due/SAM3X architecture that specfically requires two CANbus controllers…there arent any other Arduino-compatible microcontrollers out there with the horsepower and two native CAN controllers required for my project. :frowning:

Hopefully the SAM3X will still be around for a few more years…or at least until Arduino starts supporting something with similar capabilities. (32-bit, dual native CAN controllers)

as already mentioned here, on Arduino.org the Due is still listed - and another additional board, which might also find your interest: the STAR OTTO (funny name IMO):

http://www.arduino.org/component/k2/itemlist/filter?array1%5B%5D=Advanced&array2%5B%5D=ARM&array3%5B%5D=CAN&moduleId=182&Itemid=103 Microcontroller STM32F469BI Architecture ARM Cortex-M4

(2 CAN provided)

That star otto sounds interesting but for a few problems

  1. I can't seem to purchase one. Does it even exist yet?

  2. It's an Arduino.org project and they don't seem to do that well on the software side. I wonder how easily it'd be to use the CAN buses on that thing? I suppose I could download their IDE and see if there is currently a library for it.

Luckily, it seems like they kept Due compatibility for the pinout so Due CAN shields should work.

duramaxhd: there arent any other Arduino-compatible microcontrollers out there with the horsepower and two native CAN controllers required for my project. :(

The upcoming Teensy (currently in beta testing) has 2 CAN ports. It's also 180 MHz with FPU and 256K RAM. Hopefully powerful enough? It won't have the Due form factor, so less I/O, but also small size and a lower price.

Of course Teensy isn't officially Arduino (cc or org). I'd like to think the software support as been pretty good, but of course my opinion is biased. ;)

I have to admit, that Star Otto board looks pretty amazing. It'll be interesting to see if the dot org folks can learn how to do software well.

you may still also purchase Due clones from China for less than 15 EUR http://www.ebay.de/itm/DUE-R3-Board-SAM3X8E-32-bit-ARM-Cortex-M3-Control-Board-Module-for-Arduino-/252114825305?hash=item3ab336f059:g:e9sAAOSw5VFWF139

anyway, the problem is not the board itself, but the software support by Arduino.cc IDE plus further development for it's libs and stackable DUE-compatible shields (e.g., stackable L298 motor H-Bridges feat. rotary encoder readings, and PID control)

Looking at the Star Otto photos, I can't figure out how it has the advertised USB Host. There's only 1 USB connector which looks like a device-only Micro-B.

The ST chip might actually have 2 USB ports. One of them might even be capable of 480 Mbit/sec USB (like Due), but perhaps needing a ULPI PHY chip? Maybe the 2nd port is routed to one of the connectors?

ST's website also says it has an ethernet mac. I wonder if they're planned for the ability to make an ethernet shield, or if it'll end up like Due with that awesome capability unusable?

[quote author=Paul Stoffregen link=msg=2824573 date=1467479036] Looking at the Star Otto photos, I can't figure out how it has the advertised USB Host. There's only 1 USB connector which looks like a device-only Micro-B. [/quote]

It's my guess that by USB host they really mean USB OTG (on the go) which is kind of the same basic idea. The due should be able to use that mode as well. That does technically make it a USB host able to do things like talk to flash drives, mice, and keyboards. I have cables that you can use for this purpose. I can use such a cable to connect a webcam to an android smart phone since new Android phones support OTG as well.

IMO, - just for the moment, an Arduino Due Clone from China will be good enough. - for the near future some addional DUE-compatible shields with additional features and HID USB support would be fine - for the long run, only a quadcore like the Pi 3 (but completely driven by the Arduino IDE , barebone, no Linux wishfully) would have the best conditions for a long-term success of a advanced-power-Arduino board, usable also for Arduino beginners like all other Arduino boards currently.

Or take the Pi 3 "as it is", drop all that Linux stuff, and build a barebone Arduino board out of it 8)

ArthurD: Or take the Pi 3 "as it is", drop all that Linux stuff, and build a barebone Arduino board out of it 8)

But who will do this, when Broadcom refuses to sell the chips to distributors or any "small" companies?