Arduino Due supply power

Hi,

I just want to double check that I can supply a voltage of 5 volts through the Vin pin in the Arduino Due. I know that in its webpage says:

“Vin. The input voltage to the Arduino board when it's using an external power source (as opposed to 5 volts from the USB connection or other regulated power source). You can supply voltage through this pin, or if supplying voltage via the power jack, access it through this pin.”

Best,

The minimum voltage you can safely provide to Vin is 7 V. So no, you can't power your Due by supplying 5 V to that pin. This is because that pin is connected to a step-down voltage converter that takes the voltage down to 5 V. If you want to power the board with a 5 V supply, you need to connect it to the 5V pin. The 5V pin is connected to a linear voltage regulator that converts it to the 3.3 V needed to power the microcontrollers on the Due.

But if I supply power to the 5V pin it will bypass the 5V regulator according to this:

"5V.This pin outputs a regulated 5V from the regulator on the board. The board can be supplied with power either from the DC power jack (7 - 12V), the USB connector (5V), or the VIN pin of the board (7-12V). Supplying voltage via the 5V or 3.3V pins bypasses the regulator, and can damage your board. We don't advise it."

Taken from here.

Moreover, the datasheet of the 5V regulator: MPM3610 it has an operating input range from 4.5V to 21V.

Anyways, I've been looking on the internet about powering up the Arduino through the 5V and as long as you don't exceed 6V, it's fine.

Best,

Well, in your original post you said Vin, which is not the same as the 5v pin.

In your next post, you quote this:

"Supplying voltage via the 5V or 3.3V pins bypasses the regulator, and can damage your board. We don't advise it."

The MPM3610, if you read the first line of the datasheet, is a step down converter, which instantly means you need at least 5v in to get 5v out, the input range is down to 4.5v because the output can be as low as 0.8v, it isn't a fixed 5v regulator.

The MPM3610 also isn't on this Due circuit diagram:

Without seeing the circuit for the board you have, I wouldn't like to say it would work safely.
If you look at figure 1 (page 12) of the MPM3610 datasheet, if you put 5v on the output, this will backfeed to some internal parts of the chip, this may have undesired effects.

Nochika:
But if I supply power to the 5V pin it will bypass the 5V regulator according to this:

Why do you say "but"? That's exactly what I told you in my last reply.

Nochika:
Anyways, I've been looking on the internet about powering up the Arduino through the 5V and as long as you don't exceed 6V, it's fine.

Sure. The 3.3 V regulator has a safe input voltage range. The reason the 5V pin is labeled 5V is because it's normally used as an output to supply the 5 V that either comes directly from the USB cable or else from the step down voltage module of the Vin. It's much less common to use the 5V pin as a power input. Most people would just power the Due via the USB jack, since that's very easy to do with a USB charger or a USB battery pack.