Arduino Enclosures, relays and power supply

Hi Forum,

I look to complete a project on my car utilising Arduino to provide some intelligence. some jumps of logic below but bare with me:

  1. as the Vehicle will provide power from 12VDC to ~14.8VDC looking to a pre-made solid state power module which can deliver power to the Arduino/s

  2. Enclosures: I would like have the final build in a at least IP67 enclosure. any out there for arduino projects (note space is at a premium in the vehicle)

  3. Project A -door lock project-> on receiving and 12VDC to ~14.8VDC trigger - essentially triggers a 12v relay to earth to lock the doors when a travelling at a speed of say 12 miles and hour. The input is a pulse output from the speedometer controller (2,000 or 4,000 pulses per mile) - are there any off the shelf units that could fill such such (programmable)

  4. Project B - Wiper timer unit ->this unit again triggers a 12v relay to earth based on an interval and time. once it receives an input of 12VDC to ~14.8VDC it would commence preset (programmed) interval and time (say every 4 seconds tigger the relay for 2.5 seconds which is to earth) - pretty basic - again any off the shelf units which could do this?

Looking for some fairly basic stuff here- off the shelf HW modules are better if at all possible
the input triggers for these as simply 2VDC to ~14.8VDC + - for example Ign switched to ACC for the door lock project and Column switch set intermittent wiper position

The Arduino is best run at 5V . Use one of the name brand cell phone chargers which can provide a well-regulated 5V for the Arduino.

.

This is probably better for vehicle use.

tobsunPSU2.jpg

tobsunPSU2.jpg

"1. as the Vehicle will provide power from 12VDC to ~14.8VDC looking to a pre-made solid state power module which can deliver power to the Arduino/s"

DollarTree has USB car chargers that fit the round cigarette lighter power jacks in cars for $1.

Great - appreciated

any info on enclosures?

“any info on enclosures?”

For testing purposes you might use a sturdy plastic sandwich container or similar.

When using using multiple modules or circuit boards I just stick them to a 1mm thick sheet of FR4 fibreglass using neutral cure silicone bath sealant. It's strong enough to keep things in place while soldering or plugging in connectors but can be easily disassembled using a craft knife. Simpler and easier than messing around with screws.