Arduino Legality in Commercial Products

Hello!

I'm using an ATmega2560 with the Arduino bootloader inside a product I would like to sell commercially.
I implemented the chip on a custom circuit board (which does not look like an Arduino at all) designed with the sole purpose of controlling various relays and sensors.
I've also programmed it using the Arduino IDE and my sketch uses the EEPROM library and some custom code to control the I/O's.

What am I required to release, if anything? My object code? My sketch? Circuit board design?
I've been finding MANY different answers everywhere I look, and I don't entirely understand the explanation on https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/FAQ.
I'm new to all of this so I was hoping that someone could enlighten me! :slight_smile:

Cheers,
James

You could buy pre boot loaded chips and load your code. That way you have paid for any right to use the boot loader code.

Weedpharma

Theoretically, depending on which libraries you used in your sketch, the usual that you MIGHT be required to release is object code in a format that is re-linkable with newer versions of the Arduino libraries (ie the .o files that you don't normally notice. Or perhaps the final .elf file.) (This is ... messy, and unlikely.)

You could buy pre boot loaded chips and load your code. That way you have paid for any right to use the boot loader code.

The bootloader isn't required. And I doubt that anyone is paying for "rights to use the bootloader" (which is also open source.)