Arduino Lifetime

Hello.

I have built an embedded system using Arduino Uno.

Now, I want to know that how long this system may work without malfunctioning? That is, generally, how many times the "void loop()" runs after first execution?

Thanks in advance.

In theory it will run forever. In practice it depends on the environment and how you treat the board and the chip and what your code does. I've seen some projects that are still running after many years.

There are many components on your board. If you build something simple with an ATMEGA and good components (oscillator etc) and treat them fairly with good power supply then indeed it will last a long time.

To give you an idea, if you check the specs they say that at 65ºC the processor will keep working for 1929 years - see atmel Mean-Time-Between-Failure

As much as anything else, the lifetime will depend on how well you did the embedding.

Sami584:
Hello.

have built an embedded system using Arduino Uno.
Now, I want to know that how long this system may work without malfunctioning?

50 or 100 years, maybe.

Sami584:
That is, generally, how many times the "void loop()" runs after first execution?

There is no limit.

Unknown, if you use anything that uses dynamic memory allocation, such as the String class. If you do, software will likely fail long before the hardware gets old.

The flash and eeprom will fade with time, probably a decade or two, almost certainly before 50 years is up.

But reprogram and away it goes again. If you write the EEPROM in your sketch it will
wear out eventually and fatally (100,000 writes I think is the guaranteed spec).

I made a gate opener its been running for over a year with no failures (other then battery failed during winter, solar panel didn't get enough sun)...

It is in a semi water tight box out in the weather running year round. -20f to 90f Snow sleet and rain.

Arduino Uno R3

MarkT:
The flash and eeprom will fade with time, probably a decade or two, almost certainly before 50 years is up.

The guarantee from Atmel...

  1. Data Retention
    Reliability Qualification results show that the projected data retention failure rate is much less than 1 PPM over 20 years at 85°C or 100 years at 25°C.

I thought I read something about spider cracks that form in all electronics that causes a sharp increase in failure rate after 15-20 years.

Off, the chip would be fine, but the solder joints would need attention.

I read that like 5-10 years ago, so they might have solved the issue

You also need to be aware of the rollovers of the millis() (50 days) and micros() (roughly an hour) functions in long-running sketches that use them.

Qdeathstar:
I thought I read something about spider cracks that form in all electronics that causes a sharp increase in failure rate after 15-20 years.

Off, the chip would be fine, but the solder joints would need attention.

I read that like 5-10 years ago, so they might have solved the issue

To my knowledge, the failure dataof which you speak was for "leaded" solder and tinned parts. I have not seem similar articles for RoHS buildouts.

Ray

@Qdeathstar Perhaps you are talking about the intermetallics that from as tin diffusion into copper occurs.

http://www.google.com/search?q=tin+diffusion+intermetallics

@Ray I think you have it backward, leaded solder did not suffer from tin diffusion because a lead rich barrier builds up between the tin-rich solder and the copper which slows the intermetallics formation. These RoHS solders are crap and have always been crap, do some googling with NASA in the search string and find out why they suck. RoHS is loved by the electronics industry because it adds a built-in failure mode. To stop the failure mode requires adding a diffusion barrier between the RoHS solder and any copper, which is to this day is often not done. An example of a barrier is the nickel plating under gold in an ENIG (immersion gold) finish.

http://www.google.com/search?q=tin+pest+phenomenon

Once you understand intermetallics, then start to look into tin pest to understand how the tin rich RoHS solders add yet another failure mode, none of this has been fixed its up the engineer to figure out their own soldering methods and which corner it will back them into.