Arduino Nano and precise timing

I'd like to make a simple programmer for an old 2708 EPROM. All bits are burned giving a 26V pulse (voltage depends per brand) to the PGM pin during approx. 0.1 to 1 (max.) milliseconds. The Arduino Nano will run a very simple program, just a clock to increase the address using a 4040 and the databits (8x) will be outputted. The Nano will be waiting the majority of the time.

With such a simple program, how accurate will a delay statement be? Is tens of a millisecond too precise and if so, what would be a solution?

For the PGM pulse you could use delayMicroseconds which should have a resolution of 4 µs IIRC.

Whandall:
For the PGM pulse you could use delayMicroseconds which should have a resolution of 4 µs IIRC.

I once heard that timing on Arduinos would be a bit sloppy (?), but within the micro seconds range (rather than nano seconds), it is precise enough you say? For my goal, 0.1 to 1 milli seconds, that would be just fine. I just wanted to make sure that the max. of 1 ms is honored, as that could destroy the EPROM... And if the duration ends up to be much smaller than the minimum, it would not program correctly (even after the 100 programming cycles needed).

I would probably use a delayMicroseconds(200) which should give twice the needed minimum and a fifth of the maximum.

Try it and observe the pulse with an oscilloscope, there could be some switch on/off delays imposed by the switching circuit.

I once built a working whole-board EPROM programmer using a 1MHz 8080.

Timing is not all that critical - relax!

Whandall:
I would probably use a delayMicroseconds(200) which should give twice the needed minimum and a fifth of the maximum.

Try it and observe the pulse with an oscilloscope, there could be some switch on/off delays imposed by the switching circuit.

Will check, though I will select milli seconds, rather than micro seconds (as that is what the datasheet says).

georgedb:
Will check, though I will select milli seconds, rather than micro seconds (as that is what the datasheet says).

No !

You have a minimal duration of 0.1 milli seconds which is 100 micro seconds.
The allowed duration is 1 milli second which is 1000 micro seconds.

Using millis to time events shorter than a millisecond is not very sensible.

Whandall:
No !

You have a minimal duration of 0.1 milli seconds which is 100 micro seconds.
The allowed duration is 1 milli second which is 1000 micro seconds.

Using millis to time events shorten than a millisecond is not very sensible.

I see, Indeed everything smaller than 1ms is already a fraction of an ms and indeed us is the way to go. Thnx for pointing that out.