Arduino Novice looking for help on outdoor temperature reader project

Hello,

I am new to Arduino but would like to design a project.

My project idea is as follows...

-I would like to have a microcontroller outside of my room with a temperature sensor
-I would like to take a reading of the temperature
-I would then like to have the board relay that information to a board inside of my room
-I would like that board to then take that input data and display it on an lcd screen

I am not exactly sure what parts this would require. I am assuming 2 microcontrollers, an lcd screen, and an ultrasonic sensor? Is there anything I am missing?

Any advice on parts, or how to start the coding for this project would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

What is the ultrasonic sensor for? Is the connection between the Arduino boards wired or wireless? There are lots of temperature sensors available. Analog (LM35) or digital (DS18b50) are popular choices with guides and example code available for both.

groundFungus:
What is the ultrasonic sensor for? Is the connection between the Arduino boards wired or wireless? There are lots of temperature sensors available. Analog (LM35) or digital (DS18b50) are popular choices with guides and example code available for both.

My goal is to make them wireless so that the sensor can be outside of my room and the receiver can be inside of my room. I plan to 3d print a mount for the sensor in my room and a housing for the outdoor board to protect it from the elements. My goal is to be able to simply see how warm (and ideally how humid) it is outside when I first wake up.

A DHT22 is an inexpensive temperature and humidity sensor that is widely used with Arduino. It is a bit more expensive than the DHT11 but more accurate. For wireless it is hard to beat the NRF24L01 transceivers. Robin2 has written a very good tutorial on their use.

groundFungus:
A DHT22 is an inexpensive temperature and humidity sensor that is widely used with Arduino. It is a bit more expensive than the DHT11 but more accurate. For wireless it is hard to beat the NRF24L01 transceivers. Robin2 has written a very good tutorial on their use.

Thank you for the help.

So will i have everything I need with the two microcontrollers, the lcd display, the transiever, the temperature/humidity sensor, and connecting wires?

I also have an intro arduino kit with resistors and whatnot.

2 transceivers. 1 on out side with the sensor and controller and 1 inside with the controller and LCD. You might need a 10K (or so) potentiometer for the contrast adjustment of the LCD (if not in your kit). An I2C LCD might make life a bit easier. Only 2 wires (plus power and ground) instead of 6 or 7. The hd44780 LCD library makes using an I2C LCD pretty easy. The library can be installed through the IDE library manager.

The easiest and most reliable approach is to get a commercial wireless outdoor temperature and/or humidity sensor (if used, cheap on eBay) and set up an Arduino reader indoors. The sensors tolerate being outdoors and run for years on one or two AA batteries.

You need a cheap receiver that works in the same band (433 MHz is very common) and some simple software.

Most of the sensors from Accurite, Oregon Scientific, La Crosse and some other companies have been decoded. If you run into one that has not been decoded, follow the approach in this tutorial.

I second the approach of jremington. I was not aware of those outdoor units. I really doubt that you could build anything from an Arduino and components that would cost less, be as accurate and easy to implement.

aallardi:
So will i have everything I need with the two microcontrollers, the lcd display, the transiever, the temperature/humidity sensor, and connecting wires?

Power supply is missing.

Batteries for the outdoor unit probably - which requires you to delve into low-power programming (and which basically also requires you to ditch the power hungry Arduino boards themselves and go with barebones processors - when you're at it, preferably an ATtiny rather than the ATmega as used on Arduino boards for a small project like this). Also a major issue is the wireless which tends to be pretty power hungry as well.

So yeah, those ready-made wireless outdoor units sound like a great option to me. Saves a lot of the headaches, allowing you to concentrate on the indoor unit.

As an alternative, I think i am going to ditch the wireless feature and simply do a single arduino board that I will run a wire attached to the temp/humidity sensor outside of my room. This would allow me to focus mainly on the indoor unit without the headache of the communication between boards. I could then plug the board into the wall.

I have a micro hdmi (i believe thats what its called) chord that attaches directly to my arduino.